JATINGA:
    “Also noteworthy is Nate Edmondson’s work on music, transportative and transformative in its effect, from scene to scene.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “Coloured cloths hang from the roof and corrugated iron shanty shacks with dodgy wiring border the playing space. It’s so authentic and truly creates a world so vivid it was easy to forget I was in King’s Cross and not Mumbai. This, coupled with the unnerving and eerie sound design and composition from Nate Edmondson creates a magical atmosphere of uncertainty and unfamiliarity that subtly brings the show to its climax. … The small playing space at the bAKEHOUSE Theatre provides a challenge for a cast of this size, but Millar’s production navigates the stage with ease using dreamlike choreography and layered staging to contrast gritty realism and trancelike fantasy. The play runs for 85 minutes with no interval and Millar’s direction keeps the audience captivated for every single one of those minutes.”
    - Emma Caldwell (Weekend Notes)

    “Director Suzanne Millar’s bAKEHOUSE Theatre production is vividly realised with elements of dance, unison movement and puppetry to the fore. … Staged in traverse, as is always the case in this venue, the production (designed by Millar and John Harrison) is spare but effective. Nate Edmondson’s dense soundtrack of music, bird cries and sound effects contribute to the impression that Jatinga could be a story powerfully told in film someday.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    Jatinga is a highly provocative, intelligent and engrossing theatrical experience, which challenges romantic ideas of India. … The extent of the research conducted and involvement of creatives working on the ground in the region is evident, and it’s a credit to Millar and her team that they’ve worked to ensure the involvement of two Mumbai actors. There’s a tangible sense of authenticity about this production, and that very obviously owes to that care and thought in creating the work. … In speaking to Theatre People recently to discuss the piece, Millar spoke of her aim to put “a little piece of India on stage”, and this production achieves precisely that. Thanks to the performances, simple but beautifully incorporated movement content, Nate Edmondson’s lush and sometimes cinematic soundscape, and Benjamin Brockman’s sensitive lighting of the intimate theatre’s traverse stage, Jatinga creates a sense of being a genuine bystander to the unfolding events. It is original, it is important, and thoroughly gripping.”
    - Tim Garratt (Theatre People)

    “On an authentic and – knowing this small traverse space – amazingly detailed and ‘beautiful’ Set Design, by Suzanne Millar and John Harrison, the story unfolds in a surrealistic juxtaposition of hard nosed contemporary reality and haunting folk myths in song, dance and puppetry (Puppetry Design and Construction by Aleisha Jelbart). The complicated and beautiful Lighting Design, by Benjamin Brockman creates a broad, and when needed, a detailed feature-guide, to help focus the audience’s attentions for narrative impact, in co-hort, with a truly wonderfully culturally redolent soundscape of music and atmospheric support by Nate Edmondson. Suzanne Millar is also responsible for the Costume Design. The visual and aural creativity to assist us to suspend our disbelief is first class. … Like the recent bAKEHOUSE production of The Laden Table, this production of Jatinga is an ambitious contribution to the Sydney theatre scene and is outstanding in its achievement and leaves one questioning the product, ambition and courage of more financially advantaged companies such as the Sydney Theatre Company, Belvoir and the Griffin. Australia Council and the relevant Government bodies ought to be taking notice. … The passion combined with artistic nous and invention as exampled here makes theatre of a most valuable kind. Modern and mythical India, alive in Kings Cross. Amazing. Do go.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “…Jatinga, is the result of a cross-cultural collaboration with Mumbai’s Aarambh Theatre and its artistic director, playwright Purva Naresh. The result is a 90-minute epic much bigger than its small performance space; a crackling examination of the plight of exploited women in India. … Millar directs this production, and while it takes a few moments to warm up – the opening scene feels particularly stilted, though it has a rich payoff later – it soon falls into an irresistible blend of music (Nate Edmondson’s soundscape is particularly evocative), movement, puppetry, and arresting performances. … For one of our smallest companies to reach out so far beyond themselves to make a difference in the world is remarkable. The play is compelling and so is its reach, so don’t miss it – and next time a ‘cause’ on stage moves you, find out how you can help.”
    - Cassie Tongue (Time Out Sydney)

    “The intimate setting made the play alternatively dramatic and jarring. The production lets you dive into the colourful culture of India, its enjoyment of song and dance. It’s not a ‘rags to riches’ story but a tale of struggle and strife. … Jatinga has an incredible mode of storytelling that propelled the magnificent and intense plot. As director Suzanne Millar explained, ‘it’s a big sprawling, messy, beautiful thing…a lot like India itself’. It felt like a roller coaster experiencing the play’s world and left us at the edge of our seats, itching to know what happens next. Jatinga will leave you stunned and emotional with its energetic cast, colourful sets, costumes, and confronting themes.”
    - Kevin Rodrigueza (The Plus Ones)

    “The ramshackle backstreets and alleys of Mumbai are brought to brilliant life in this evocative play about the journey of five young women seeking escape from a grim looking future. Such a story could have easily been a very long and depressing night of theatre, but it turned out just the opposite, full of laughter and imbued with a beautiful yet subdued mysticism. … Sound and lighting by dream team duo Nate Edmondson and Benjamin Brockman was idyllic as we were transported to Kamathipura, a village that enjoys the dubious distinction of being the oldest and second largest red-light district in Mumbai.”
    - Joy Minter (The Buzz From Sydney)

    “It is wonderful that Naresh is putting women’s stories on stage and showing the world a story from a region whose stories are not often told in western theatres. Drawing on the audience’s imagination, flocks of birds are implied by a sweeping dance and Champa’s hockey games are well choreographed to capture the energy and excitement.”
    - Jade Kops (Broadway World)

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THE VILLAGE BIKE:
    “One of the best independent productions of the year. In two incident and emotion-packed acts, The Village Bike turns from raunchy sitcom into an unflinching exploration of desire, the alternative reality bubble in which affairs are so often conducted, and the punishments inflicted on women who go beyond the pale. … From an audience perspective, it’s akin to starting your evening watching an episode of The Good Life and finishing it with Lars von Trier’s Breaking the Waves. The effect is devastating. …cast mates and director Rachel Chant’s impressive production support her at every turn. … Detailed lighting (Hartley TA Kemp) and sound design (Nate Edmondson) add to the impression that this production could sit proudly on any mainstage in Sydney.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “Behind the busy bar of a rough and tumble Woolloomooloo drinking spot, downstairs, between the busy kitchen, the inadequate toilets and a dining area is the cramped theatre space. The stacked audience face a perfect little setting in which everything works – the doors, the upstairs bedroom, the rumbling pipes, the computer, the sink, the bike. The Sydney Theatre Company couldn’t wish for a more polished and convincing set. … Brilliant lighting by Hartley Kemp makes every bit of the set work and the compositions of Nate Edmondson fill every second of time between the scenes. Full marks to director Rachel Chant, whose desire for perfection is hereby duly noted.”
    - Frank Hatherley (Stage Whispers)

    “Nate Edmondson’s sound design gives the impression of a light sitcom, which the work does feel like on the surface, and includes a wonderful composition for Becky’s bike ride to freedom.”
    - Jade Kops (Broadway World)

    “Rachel Chant has directed a fine and smart production — which mostly manages to strike the right balance between light and dark… The production, designed by Anna Gardiner and Martelle Hunt is a smart use of the tiny Old Fitz space — taking place across two floors and three distinct locations — while Nate Edmondson’s compositions and sound design set the appropriate tone.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review)

    “Although political and intellectual, the production is equally stimulating on other fronts. Rachel Chant’s direction ensures each personality we meet is distinct and vividly manifested, so we know exactly what it is that makes them tick (and how they contribute to the play’s tragic circumstances). Sequences oscillate between comedy and drama effortlessly, with moments of breathtaking sexual tension giving an excellent sense of texture and dimension to what we see, hear and feel.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “The convergence of talent in Red Line Productions current staging of The Village Bike makes it a rare and thrilling theatre experience. … Definitely worth the ride!”
    - Rita Bratovich (Alt Media)

    “Their newly renovated gorgeous country cottage is a problem too: the plumbing is tricky and incomplete – the pipes form a piquant part of the sumptuously detailed and cleverly lit two-storey set (Anna Gardiner and Martelle Hunt with lighting by Hartley TA Kemp) – and the intermittent racket from them forms a witty counterpoint to Nate Edmondson’s equally sumptuous, tongue-in-cheek sound design. …this production is superb and together with the performances as detailed above, it’s lifted to a place of really recommended.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “This show was a knockout… A strong, sparring drama with good performances and  was well suited to the intimacy of the Old Fitz. … Nate Edmondson’s edgy soundscape and a sharp lighting design by Hartley T A Kemp enhance the action on stage. … Highly recommended.”
    - David Kary (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “Anna Gardiner and Martelle Hunt’s set is a charming multi-layered home, giving refreshing height to the Old Fitz playing space; Hartley TA Kemp’s lighting gives it depth, and Nate Edmondson’s music suggests an English comedy of manners, from which form The Village Bike is at least partially drawn. It’s a pleasant and welcoming kind of atmosphere, which stops the play from ever being completely bleak.”
    - Cassie Tongue (Time Out Sydney)

    “Rachel Chant directs a well-honed production on an impressive two-storey set by Anna Gardiner and Martelle Hunt.”
    - The Daily Telegraph

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THE HAM FUNERAL:
    “Gaul’s production of this iconic play does not shy away from the script’s surreal elements and larger than life characters – the show is somewhat dream-like but also recognisably Australian through a humour and audacity that Patrick White so deeply revered and revealed with every stroke of his pen.”
    - Arts Review

    “According to White’s scene setting instructions, the poet symbolically descends from garret to basement as the play unfolds. The Griffin stage can’t offer that as a possibility. Instead, Gaul and designer Jasmine Christie confine the action to one level, a shiny-floored abstract space whose only permanent feature is a steel bench, simultaneously suggesting commercial kitchen and autopsy table. The rest of the “great, damp, crumbling house” is conjured in the mind by composer Nate Edmondson, whose surround sound underscore makes it seem like a malevolent living presence.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “The surreal world of White’s play is unlike any other in the Australian canon, and although there are touches of the existential terrain explored by Beckett and Ionesco, The Ham Funeral predates the majority of work by those leading exponents of absurdist/existential theatre. … Kate Gaul, one of Sydney’s most insightful, confident and versatile directors, is entirely up to the challenges presented by the play, and has created a production that sings with all the music and poeticism of White’s text. … Nate Edmondson’s sound design suggests the setting brilliantly, with all the subtle creaks and drip-drops of the old, ramshackle house, while his music creeps in at exactly the right moments. … This is an entertaining, imaginative, first-rate and crystal clear production of one of the most idiosyncratic plays ever written by an Australian playwright. It’s no fusty museum piece, but should be seen by everyone with an interest in the handful of plays that make up the Australian theatrical canon.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review)

    The Ham Funeral is dense and wildly obtuse and director Kate Gaul has steered a lucid path through it and achieves a bright, light production of what is also a darkly humorous gothic drama. … That world is vividly portrayed in this production, not least through a remarkable soundscape by Nate Edmondson that is integral to the action. You could swear the smells of coal, rancid dripping and cheap perfume hang in the air of the Stables theatre along with the sweaty ghosts of characters past. It’s captivating and wonderfully weird… This is a glorious production – Recommended.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “Patrick White’s surrealist work is not one to rely on for narrative pleasure, but as a platform for theatrical delight, it swells with possibilities. Director Kate Gaul identifies the extremities in the play, whether they be comedic, dramatic, grotesque or celestial, and turns them into sequences of sheer and intense pleasure. There is a cohesive whole, but the primary enjoyment of this staging is in the savouring of all its deeply fascinating moments. A vague logic does exist, but our senses, beyond those that comprise the rational mind, are fired up and called upon to engage, in a visceral way that can only happen within a live setting. It is a waking dream in which we find ourselves immersed. Nothing looks real, but we know that everything points to something authentic. We are gripped by its mystery, and the hypnotic ambience so expertly manufactured by its team of daring creatives. Hartley T A Kemp lights the space so that everything seems to float in an abyss of subconsciousness, and Nate Edmondson’s sensational sounds of ringing and rumbling take over our nervous system, directly manipulating our moods and responses.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “This is a breathtaking production of a landmark play, riveting and humorous. … This is a fabulous production of this at times grotesque, mythological, symbolic, challenging and grippingly dynamic play.”
    - Lynne Lancaster (Arts Hub)

    “It had been said that the play was ‘a triumph of the imagination over mediocrity’. This can certainly be said of director Kate Gaul’s latest production for Griffin Independent at The Stables Theatre presented by Gaul’s Siren Theatre Company. … Design by Jasmine Christie, Lightng by Hartley T A Kemp and Sound by Nate Edmondson all contribute to make this a memorable production. The Ham Funeral is thoughtful, funny and really enjoyable. It’s worth a trip to the Stables in Kings Cross to see it.”
    - Bronwyn Fullerton (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “Designer Jasmine Christie has created a dank and bare space that stretches into an eternity of blackness; Nate Edmondson’s sound design imbues that minimalistic set with ominous, murky atmosphere (the drip of a tap, an indeterminate rumble, and, with Hartley T.A Kemp’s lighting design, a sense of foreboding).”
    - Cassie Tongue (Time Out Sydney)

    “Accompanying the visual promptings is a complex and haunting soundscape by Nate Edmondson that builds up an imaginative invention of a crumbling, damp, mysterious and ‘creepy’ living space. The visuals and sound are the triumph of this production.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Given the confines of The Stables Theatre, designer Jasmine Christie has done an extraordinary job. Along with Hartley T A Kemp’s lighting and Nate Edmondson’s soundscape, the stage suggests both two-storied boarding house and the atmospheric landscape of The Young Man’s psyche. … I went in a bit dubious, wondering if Patrick White wasn’t a bit much on the Friday night of a long, arduous week at work, when I would rather have been sharing a round or two of drinks. But I came out tipsy on thoughts of the meaning of life and high on the energy of some great performances.”
    - Toni Carroll (Molong Online)

    “Directed by Kate Gaul, The Ham Funeral is set in a dim and decaying house where Mr and Mrs Lusty bicker about the state of their existence. … The lighting and sound superbly captured its bleakness…”
    - Penny Spirou (Australian Stage)

    “Directed by Kate Gaul, this production is a brave choice for the intimate Stables Theatre. … Technically, this production is very schmick. Nate Edmondson’s underscoring soundscape is remarkable and truly transportive. It’s subtle and refined, but always lurking in the background. This, and Hartley T A Kemp’s ethereal, dreamlike lights, adds a wonderful level of depth to this production.”
    - Alana Kaye (Theatre Now)

    The Ham Funeral, presented by Siren Theatre Company in association with Griffin Independent is absurdist theatre at its finest. … Absurdist, vaguely existential theatre like The Ham Funeral comes with a myriad of difficulties for both cast and creative teams. Luckily, the brilliant combination of director Kate Gaul, sound designer Nate Edmondson and lighting designer Hartley T A Kemp are more than up to the challenge. The compositions and background noise gives the dingy setting a character of its own, lending a malevolent, anxious atmosphere to the play.”
    - Matthew MacDonald (The Buzz From Sydney)

    “This Siren Theatre Co production, directed by Kate Gaul for Griffin Independent, captures the play’s exuberant theatricality, with some wonderfully bizarre, darkly comic moments. Within the confines of the tiny space, the design team – Jasmine Christie (set and costumes), Hartley T.A. Kemp (lighting) and Nate Edmondson (sound) do an inspired job of evoking the fetid, crumbling house.”
    - The Daily Telegraph

    “Patrick White’s bizarre play, The Ham Funeral is given new life in the intimate space of Griffin Theatre’s SBW Stables. First presented in Adelaide in 1961, Director and producer Kate Gaul ensures that this once shocking work still retains an aura of absurdity as she draws the audience to bare witness to the events surrounding the decrepit post war lodging house. … Composer and sound designer Nate Edmondson brings the decaying, vermin infested house to life with a persistent ‘breathing’ and the distant sound of a busy city.”
    - Jade Kops (Broadway World)

    “Deliciously, Kate Gaul does away with the three component of the psyche in her single level house, symbolised only by the great table Mr Lusty will call Love. The Griffin Theatre doesn’t lend itself to this multi-leveled symbolism, but Kate Gaul uses breadth instead of depth to create the journey to realisation our poet makes within himself. Nate Edmondson infuses the room with the creaking and moaning sounds of the circumventuous rotting house, forcing the invisible story’s to the stage such that we never doubt they are there. In this way, under Kate Gaul’s direction, The Ham Funeral becomes not just a literary thought, but the form of that thought. As a fiercely independent and yet working director, Kate Gaul manifests the idealised vision of Patrick White; that the writer become absent in the face of the thinking word. When Kate Gaul directs him, Patrick White is at last accompanied by a successive manifesto of the work becoming absolute. Our poet becomes The Ham Funeral fully realised. … From the pure perspective of production, the play is an essential part of the theatre goers 2017 calendar. True to White’s vaudevillian love, The Ham Funeral is entrenched in a crumbling carnival aesthetic, consistent to the Dobell art work that spawned the original spark of the play.”
    - Lisa Thatcher

    “Composer & Sound Designer Nate Edmondson also throws everything into preparing a perfect canvas on which to paint numerous of the most colourful, esoteric characters e’er written for the stage… At times difficult to decipher (and frustratingly so), at others imbued with profoundly empathic, if incorrigibly (and ironically, if names are anything go by) black, insights into ‘the human condition’, Gaul, cast and creatives consistently ensure production values always meet the unapproachable genius that was and is White. The result is, at once, symphonically Stygian, luxuriantly lurid; a veritable circus of Shakespearean proportions, viewed through a prism that could only be Australian. Finally and better yet, it represents both liberation and damnation. The former, for all those hankering to jolt, to move an audience in cathartic degree, to challenge and confront, it’s a prescient beacon of theatrical possibilities. The latter, for it curses and condemns all the steaming mediocrity so many of us have had to endure over recent years. It ought to reawaken and reinvigorate our dead for excellence and, if it does, that will have been more than enough. As I publish, only a week to run. Don’t waste a moment.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Syke On Stage)

    “Nate Edmondson’s enveloping sound design conjures that creaking and grinding like a haunting, with distant melodies floating by and the sudden presence of a ticking clock. Alma too listens, hearing the damp and the furniture. … This modest, intensely intimate production is another that reveals the enduring power of The Ham Funeral.”
    - Keith Gallisch (Realtime)

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BENGAL TIGER AT
THE BAGHDAD ZOO:
    “The show looks great – the design is simple and effective, with a brilliant soundtrack by Nate Edmondson and beautiful costumes by Stephanie Howe.”
    - Peter Gotting (Stage Whispers)

    “Rajiv Joseph’s acclaimed play Bengal Tiger At The Baghdad Zoo is presented by Mad March Hare Theatre with compact creativity at the Old Fitz Theatre as part of Red Line Theatre’s season of Unspoken stories. Under Claudia Barrie’s direction, the spirit filled story of the questions which haunt those that have ever pondered their purpose plays out with recognisable elements from the truth that underpins Joseph’s imaginative story. … Bengal Tiger At The Baghdad Zoo is a thought provoking, interesting work with some wonderful entertainment from Dence as the gutsy, no nonsense Tiger. Humorous and shocking in the exposure of human behaviour towards each other and the innocent, this is work worth seeing…”
    - Jade Kops (Broadway World)

    Bengal Tiger At The Baghdad Zoo truly earns its stripes as one of the should see shows of the Old Fitz season.”
    - Richard Cotter (Australian Stage)

    “Barrie’s production is finely emotionally wrought, and she makes plenty of confident and bold directorial choices… that never takes you out of the world of the play, which is conjured up in magical ways by Isabel Hudson’s simple cyclone wire set, Benjamin Brockman’s colourful, otherworldly lighting and Nate Edmondson’s atmospheric and surprisingly understated sound design.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review)

    “An Easter Saturday night opening at the Old Fitz. And what an opening. Bengal Tiger At The Baghdad Zoo, by Rajiv Joseph, presented by a young independent company, Mad March Hare Theatre, directed by Claudia Barrie, was an unexpected pleasure. One of the highest order. … I have not had a better time in the theatre since Angels In America for the assiduous and daring conversations that we have with the characters and the challenge of the content of the play. On top of that, Mad March Theatre has found a group of collaborators that confidently and without a single unsteady will, deliver clarity and vivacity to all that they do in service to the vision of Mr Joseph’s play. … Nate Edmondson, Composer and Sound Designer, has contributed a rousing and propelling, authentic sounding soundscape to keep the play moving and focused – the best of his prolific contributions to the Sydney theatre world for some time. … Go. Do not miss this production if you cherish theatrical excellence.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “This is an intelligently written, witty and well-performed play that will leave the audience with many unanswered questions. Sydney audiences are lucky to have a production of this caliber currently showing at the Old Fitz.”
    - Vanessa Powell (Alt Media)

    “Director Claudia Barrie’s intimately scaled, emotionally gripping production draws its audience into it, slowly at first, but very completely. A stretch of ripped wire fencing serves for zoo cage and permeable barrier between life and death (an Isabel Hudson design). Creative sound and light (Nate Edmondson and Benjamin Brockman, respectively) help move the audience back and forth between life, afterlife and the spaces in between. … Bengal Tiger burns bright. Don’t miss it.”
    - Jason Blake (Time Out Sydney)

    Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo is beautifully rich and multi-leveled. … Director Claudia Barrie’s production is powerful theatre, visually and linguistically exciting.”
    - Paul Gilchrist (Theatre Red)

    “It is a brilliant play, intricate, imaginative, deep and extremely moving. It debuted on Broadway in a large theatre and we Sydney audiences are therefore particularly lucky to have the opportunity to see this play in such an intimate setting. What must have been a very entertaining play in its original incarnation is absolutely spellbinding at The Old Fitz, due to the direction of Claudia Barrie. … This is the best of theatre and we are so lucky to have such talent and creativity in Sydney.”
    - Jenny Bromberger

    “In Nate Edmondson’s glorious (de)composition, we have the clarion call for revolutionaries to measure up to the revolution to be made. Herein lies one of the great beauties of this production of Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo. … A sublime example of evocative collaboration, Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo finds its place among the provocative, transgressive and universal. Highly recommended.”
    - Lisa Thatcher

    “A production that engages with the events of the Iraq War has got to be a heavy hitter. But this production manages to deal with even bigger questions, like, ‘what is the meaning of life?’ Claudia Barrie’s piece engages strikingly with these big picture questions and issues and doesn’t recoil away from a bit of grit. With great performances from the whole cast, this show is something fierce.”
    - Emily Richardson (Upstaged Reviews)

    “The play, via a face smear of chalky white denoting each death, then becomes a ghost story as the Tiger prowls and watches amid the ruins (simple, persuasive setting by Isabel Hudson, effectively lit by Benjamin Brockman with a beautiful soundtrack for this unnerving place and time by Nate Edmondson). … Director Claudia Barrie keeps a tight rein and focus on what could be, in lesser hands, a slithery landscape of dreams and nightmares, fantasy and reality. … It’s not often that one leaves a theatre provoked by a tiger into deep thought about life and death and laughter and the whole damn thing, but this is one of those occasions. Recommended.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “Rajiv Joseph’s, Bengal Tiger At The Baghdad Zoo is a very tricky play. You can’t profile it, it does not allow itself to stay very long in any one genre. There is comedy, drama, horror, violence, realism, fantasy… It is a very complicated play and it requires a very bold directorial vision. I am thankful Claudia Barrie was courageous enough to take the challenge and delighted that she succeeded. The play moves from pin point comedy to chilling violence and back with the elegance of a ballerina. … Nate Edmondson‘s soundscape was spot on. It was understated but not unnoticed and built the tension into scenes as well as creating a vibrant middle eastern vibe. … The show closes this weekend and I have hear rumours of it being sold out. Deservedly so but keep checking for a chance to sneak in. Its worth it.”
    - Lynden Jones (Theatre Now)

    “The writing is emotional and imaginative, with ghosts and paranoia haunting the living, and troubling philosophy interrogating the dead. Having Americans and Iraqis at the centre of the action might allow Australian viewers to distance ourselves from its very difficult themes, but the production’s extraordinary intensity is determined to have us embroiled. It is powerful work by director Claudia Barrie, who invests great detail and dynamism into all facets of her show. An unrelenting atmosphere of tension akin to horror movies and war zones, is marvellously established by a bevy of design talents. Nate Edmondson’s music in particular, impresses with its exceptional precision in calibrating tonal shifts, allowing us to flow with the play’s many surprising and contrasting moods, with no apparent effort at all.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

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STONES IN HIS POCKETS:
    “Sound design by Nate Edmondson added a fine atmosphere to the show.”
    - Len Power (Canberra Critics Circle)

    “The sound track that accompanied the play is also good, not just concentrating on Irish music, but across genres to create the atmosphere needed for the numerous scenes. Another scene worthy of mention is the celebration where Grant and Sean do a type of Irish dance, hilarious and clever at the same time. … This is a fast-paced play, bursting with hilarity, even though there is a sad underlying theme. Well worth a night out.”
    - Pauline Smith (Absolute Theatre)

    “You’d be forgiven for approaching Marie Jones’ Stones in His Pockets with trepidation. There is the title itself, the likely Oirish lads — boots (and caps and vests) and all — and the lilting tunes playing as you enter the theatre. … Well that’s not Stones in His Pockets at’all, at’all. Instead (and let’s drop all the mock Irish stuff now) it’s a tight little drama with a couple of well- manufactured twists that gives its actors some impressive technical challenges and its audience some impressive rewards. … Cartwright and Hawkins’ whirlwind, muscular performances, and terrific direction by Chris Bendall, on a welcome return to Perth, made for a genuinely engaging entertainment that was warmly, and justly, applauded by a capacity audience.”
    - David Zampatti (The West Australian)

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BLACKROCK:
    “This production, directed by Kim Hardwick, has all of her usual hallmark visual details. Designed, by Isabel Hudson – a black rock resting on a floor of shifting sand – and lit by Martin Kinnane with sinister shifting effect, accompanied by a subtle soundscape, composed, by Nate Edmondson.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Nate Edmondson’s score/sound design does wonders to unify the world, and although the musical pieces are a little heavy handed, they are not out of place. It is a typically slick and atmospheric production by director Kim Hardwick.”
    - Ann Foo (Arts Hub)

    Blackrock, Nick Enright’s harrowing work of fiction inspired by the actual 1989 murder of teenager Leigh Leigh in Stockton, NSW, proves its enduring relevance with White Box Theatre’s noteworthy staging at The Seymour Centre under the direction of Kim Hardwick. The set (which is at first covered in a large autopsy-esque plastic sheet) is sensory and simplistic – a large rock face protrudes from a sand covered stage. Effectively evoking an ocean side atmosphere, together with a skirting of milk crates and plastic lawn chairs and a coastal soundscape. … Considered, weighty and wonderfully executed (especially considering the budget constraints), this production of Blackrock is important and telling theatre, and trigger warnings should be well regarded.”
    - Alannah Maher (Alt Media)

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MARK COLVIN’S KIDNEY:
    “…director David Berthold finds a variety of smart staging solutions to the challenges of telling a story that unfolded largely through social media platforms, emails, phone calls and text messages. His use of video projection and Nate Edmondson’s cinematic, tension-building score, keep the story moving at a decent pace.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review)

    “Director David Berthold has lucidly orchestrated the complex set of characters and performances and the telling of the tales is compelling and rewarding. The set design by Michael Hankin is a virtually empty stage with an occasional table, desk, hospital gear and ever-changing back projections and surtitles (by Vexran Productions); both enhanced by a tightly integrated lighting set-up (Damien Cooper) and punctuated by a gorgeous and almost filmic soundtrack by Nate Edmondson.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “This virtual documentary of how Australian Mary-Ellen Field, one-time ‘brand manager’ for famous Australian model Elle Macpherson, came to donate her kidney to Mark Colvin, highly-respected radio journalist and long-time presenter of ABC Radio’s daily PM, is rather like a two-hour version of ABC TV’s weekly Australian Story. That’s not a complaint. On stage, with projections that look as good as the best high definition tv and full-on (far better than home) theatre sound, and where the participants live and breathe right before us, this is one of the best Australian stories around.”
    - Frank McKone (Canberra Critics Circle)

    “Director David Berthold directs this production with care and consideration, and finds clever ways to stage a story that in reality unfolded mostly through the phone calls, text messages and emails. Video projection upstage is a nice reminder of the truth of this story, and the damage that was caused when it all exploded. … Nate Edmondson’s compositions take the tension of the projections to another level…”
    - Alana Kaye (Theatre Now)

    “The play’s production team use enthralling techniques in sound and lighting and the minimalist set of alluring grey walls covered with shining perspex unfold the text message relationship that develops between Colvin and Field. … Is it a play or an opera? The director David Berthold has invested great licence in the actors to embrace their roles with compassion, dignity and humour. The production creative team also embraced the text and the direction and delivered a ‘perfectly formed’ new Australian play.”
    - Margaret Helman (Sydney Scoop)

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POLITICAL CHILDREN:
    “Lights by Benjamin Brockman and music by Nate Edmondson are employed with a deft touch to guide us boldly through every unequivocal statement; technical design for the production is heavily relied upon not just to cue emotional responses, but also to help us with all the character and plot details we need to know.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

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THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY:
    “And Nate Edmondson’s subtle original music is equally hard to grasp hold of. The tinny echoes of a fairground organ or the reverberations of Harry’s tuneless whistle with instruments which escape easy classification. The low and lingering topped by crystal lightness for a tightrope walk which leads into a cello / string / electric under-wail for the ensuing monologue. It is a marvellously cohesive production.”
    - Judith Greenaway (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “This Siren Theatre production directed by Kate Gaul is elegantly simple and exceptionally clear. …in what for me is the stand out show of the Mardi Gras festival so far.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “The sophistication of the script is reflected in the production’s look and sound, with an exceedingly elegant team of designers bringing to the space, a serene beauty that evokes an appropriate grandness of emotion and meaning, so as to correspond to Harry’s extraordinary experiences. … Director Kate Gaul’s confident, understated approach gives us a very smart show, with a lot of integrity injected into her depiction of one of society’s most misunderstood. There is a real beauty in Gaul’s theatricality…”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “The design (Alice Morgan) and lighting (Matt Cox) are simple, effective and variously atmospheric, as is Nate Edmondson’s clever sound score – you can almost smell the bad drains, stale beer and sweat and visualise the lurking fears and questions of what was essentially a sepia-lit, fugitive existence. … Programmed by the Seymour Centre and Siren for this year’s Mardi Gras festival, The Trouble With Harry is a very fine production that deserves a wide audience. Recommended.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “Director, Kate Gaul has built with her Designers, Alice Morgan (Set and Costume), Matt Cox (Lighting) and Nate Edmondson (Sound and Composition) a seductive environment to create a means of attention focusing for the telling of the story. … The stage pictures are sometimes exquisite, painterly, in their staging by Ms Gaul. Mr Edmondson’s Sound Composition is particularly beautiful and is sparing in its use, supporting almost unconsciously, in the background, the emotions of the play, without spectacle.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    The Trouble With Harry is an intriguing mystery that asks more questions than it answers, packaged in a beautifully simple staging that allows focus to remain on the characters, and the mental images and emotions that Philpott’s text evokes.”
    - Jade Kops (Broadway World)

    “…Nate Edmondson’s sound design, Matt Cox’s moody and sinister lighting, and Morgan’s costumes and set — which all feel like they’re part of the one artistic vision. And that’s Gaul’s strength as a director: she always seems to be able to wrangle every part of a production together and make it work as a cohesive whole, serving the text in the most vibrant and integral way possible. This is a great piece of Australian writing, new to Sydney stages, and served up in a wonderful production.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review)

    “This production has been keenly directed by Kate Gaul, and elegantly designed. Lighting by Matt Cox is emotive and evocative, and dances around Alice Morgan’s ethereal set beautifully. Sound and music by Nate Edmondson complements the piece nicely, on the whole.”
    - Alana Kaye (Theatre Now)

    “On Alice Morgan’s pleasingly rustic set of sturdy, unsentimental decking and wooden boxes, Matt Cox’s lights and Nate Edmondson’s sound summon a sense of foreboding that grows – and occasionally ebbs away for moments of relief – throughout the taut 85-minute running time. … Gaul’s production and Philpott’s script offer an eloquent argument for examining our history and releasing genuine human struggle from the badge of scandal; it gives dignity back to those who had it ripped from them.”
    - Cassie Tongue (Time Out Sydney)

    “Staged in the precocious Reginald Theatre right at the bottom of The Seymour Centre, producer and director Kate Gaul has hoisted this play onto the shores of an intimate landscape. The actors move freely within the confines of a tiered wooden stage, and give the illusion of being shipwrecked upon their own lives. Two lovers irrevocably intertwined, Harry Crawford (Jodie Le Vesconte) and his wife Annie Birkett (Jane Phegan) dance in unison towards their mutual demise where lies, fear and condemnation plague and eventually destroy them. To the sounds of an almost cinematic musical score, we see unfold at once the story of two lovers, their family and the people who watch them. The Trouble with Harry is a contemporary commentary on the vicious nature of rumor and the power of assumption, themes especially valid in today’s post-truth world.”
    - Revile The Review

    “Director Kate Gaul and her design team – Alice Morgan (Set & Costume), Matt Cox (Lighting) and Nate Edmondson (Sound and Composition) have created an almost eerie setting to tell the story. The action tends to play out under the hazy glow of sepia on a raised rough-hewn platform (which reminded me of an execution scaffold) against a backdrop of two shabby see-through curtains. The score is spare and haunting, reflecting the changing moods in the play. … This is a notable production of an Australian play for the 2017 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival.”
    - Veronica Hannon (Gay News Network)

    “Given the very modern nature of the subject matter, The Trouble With Harry appears to be a series of flickering photographs combining to make a film. By evoking the passivity of film, Kate Gaul is able to transcend the problems of the enormity of the text and create spaces for the fragments of realty summoned to install themselves. … Kate Gaul amassed a superb team of creatives to bring Lachlan Philpott’s words to life. The list of names reads like a whose who of great creative talent in Sydney 2017. Nate Edmondson composing and performing sound, Alice Morgan’s production design and Matt Cox giving us the exquisite lighting that becomes so important to Kate Gaul’s ability to whisk Harry back and forth through time. … Highly recommended.”
    - Lisa Thatcher

    “Designers Alice Morgan, Matt Cox and Nate Edmondson effectively create a forlorn, sepia, early twentieth century Sydney. … With a fine cast, director Kate Gaul creates a captivating night of theatre.”
    - Paul Gilchrist (Theatre Red)

    The Trouble With Harry is emotional and powerful and the audience were mesmerised from the first words. … Evocative music playing in the background and clever lighting created the mood whilst some gentle humour stopped it from being too dark. … The intimate space of the Reginald Theatre was packed to capacity and provided the right atmosphere for such a confronting piece. The Trouble With Harry will stay with you long after it ends and will cause you to question your own sense of self and your attitude to others.”
    - Janelle (Weekend Notes)

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BU21:
    “A sense of theatricality is built around the main concern to provide greater structural complexity, but the value of BU21 is in the intimacy at which it allows us to observe unadulterated human responses to catastrophe. Direction by Erin Taylor brings a certain minimal elegance that keeps our minds attentive only to what is important at each moment. There is great sensitivity to her storytelling that protects us from ever feeling alienated, no matter how the phenomenon of pain is expressed. The messy business of dealing with emotional devastation is often ugly, but Taylor is always able to let humanity emerge, and our empathy cannot help but connect with it. Atmosphere is calibrated gently, but brilliantly, by Christopher Page’s lights and Nate Edmondson’s sound and music. Both demonstrate acuity and artistic maturity with their respective disciplines, contributing significantly to a show that communicates with precision and confident ease.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “The creative team led by director Erin Taylor conjures a multitude of settings from a multipurpose utilitarian room with very minimal elements. … Nate Edmondson creates an impressively large soundscape in the intimate space and although some of the underscoring works better than others you can hear what he is trying to achieve. In fact there is stillness to the physicality of the work that lends itself to hearing rather than watching the play.”
    - Fiona Hallenan-Barker (Theatre Now)

    “This is an excellent production at the 505 theatre, complete with complex characters and a beautifully executed choreographic relationship to the synchronicity of nationalism and the easy flow of taking refuge in the aggressive stance of the other. … This is enhanced by the evocative lighting of Christopher Page, Tom Bannerman’s set and Nate Edmondson’s exquisite sound that forces the audience to imagine it has experienced a terror attack at one point. BU21 as a whole is a beautifully nuanced experience that explores what is happening to us when we react to a terrorist attack, whether we were on site or not. … BU21 comes highly recommended. Don’t miss this.”
    - Lisa Thatcher

    “How does a city and its people respond to such an attack? In the unfamiliar horror visited by a big city not used to such events, its citizens’ responses are revealing, hilarious and ultimately human. The real power of sound design, here masterfully delivered by Sydney Theatre Company regular Nate Edmondson, is to the fore in this production. When we see playbacks on CCTV or handicam of terrorist attacks, the fidelity is never quite there for obvious reasons. But the ‘true violence’ of the surround sound depicting the plane crashing was so immersive, you could feel the chaos and evil taking over in such a moment. The feeling that this is it, nobody can save you. … Great performances, beautifully staged and directed.”
    - Mark O’Connor (Scenestr)

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I HATE YOU MY MOTHER:
    “Kim Hardwick moves the play with agility and Tyler Ray Hawkins’ chromatic dark set with Martin Kinnane vivid strip and detailed spot lighting delivers a high production value. So too does the rising tension of Nate Edmondson’s sound.”
    - Martin Portus (Stage Whispers)

    “The interaction between the two (Cronin and newcomer Simen Glømmen Bostad) is charged with the humour of the audience’s automatic reaction to Patricia’s zealous niceness as well as a contrasting if ill-defined unease. The latter is generated by Nate Edmondson’s sound design with echoing whispers in the opening moments hinting at something lurking in the shadows – of the past or the imagination, who knows.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “It is everything you’ve come to expect out of Red Line Productions at the Old Fitz, and yet still a complete delight and thrill to witness; I Hate You My Mother begun it’s run on Tuesday and hit the ground sprinting. The show captures you from the moment you sit down and takes you along a generational journey that resembles a 1000 piece puzzle than a linear sequence. … Immeasurable credit goes to Composer and Sound Designer Nate Edmondson who held the pace, emotions and excitement of the play at a sensory level the entire show. Every moment was filled with deliberate audio (or lack of) and it complimented all other show aspects without losing its own marvel. … Undoubtedly dark and mature, I Hate You My Mother is an incredible start to the Old Fitz’s 2017 season…”
    - Sabrina Stubbs (Theatre Now)

    “On a minimalistic black set with a gloss tile floor, set and costume designer Tyler Hawkins has positioned a variety of rectangular prisms that form platforms for a variety of items. Martin Kinnane’s (lighting design) starburst and line of fluorescent light tubes illuminates the walls and when paired with changes to the main stage lights and bursts of Nate Edmondson’s (Sound Design) sound, serve to help change locations without any physical set changes. … Presented with passion and mystery, this is an interesting new play that will satisfy audiences that enjoy being challenged with thought provoking, intelligent works.”
    - Jade Kops (Broadway World)

    “Elevated by beautiful work from its team of designers, the production is effortlessly elegant, with an atmosphere cleverly calculated to secure our attention. Director Kim Hardwick establishes an ethereal grace that underscores the entire show…”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “Director Kim Hardwick navigates the scene transitions with changes in lighting (by Martin Kinnane) and the score (2016 Sydney Theatre Award winner Nate Edmondson)…”
    - Cassie Tongue (Time Out Sydney)

    “There is Sound Design by Nate Edmondson, too. The design elements are the most interesting aspects of this experience and is obviously a strong aesthetic inclination in Ms Hardwick’s Directorial quiver.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “This play is quite adventurous, and moves backward and forward in time over four hundred years. … The design, costuming and sound is really wonderful. The play overall is so entertaining that I was sorry when it finished, hoping that the interwoven stories could just continue! I highly recommend this production.”
    - Jenny Bromberger

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GOOD WITH MAPS:
    “This delicately robust show, which is part of the Invisible Circus season at Kings Cross Theatre, is intelligent, lyrical and haunting. And in that tiny, bare space the journey is there for the taking. … Director Kate Gaul’s solid choice to use a well operated face mic, grounds the production. Phelan can move any way without the audience losing content and Gaul’s direction resists the temptation to put the performer at the head of the traverse where she can always be fully seen. It also gives Phelan the freedom to use her vocal range to create emotional landscapes for the listener. Supported by the brilliant soundscape of audio designer and composer Nate Edmondson. I always seem to love Edmondson’s work but this is something special. With absolutely no sense of cultural appropriation, his themes are a counterpointed homage to South American rhythms and instruments. Flutes, woodblocks, shakers, claves all sneak in as the music heightens emotional moments yet allows for silences. The single instrument for the dragonfly which swells and rises evocatively to suddenly fall silent as the speaker’s father appears in the story gave me goosebumps. Very, very quick hits and punctuations sometimes. That few seconds of violin at the mention of the Belle Époque! Marvellous.”
    - Judith Greenaway (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “Nate Edmondson’s sound design and compositions immerse you in the various worlds of the play, while Louise Mason’s lighting traces each dramatic turn perfectly. In fact, every element in this production is in step and working together to create this fascinating and ultimately heartbreaking piece of theatre.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review)

    “With minimal staging your focus is never distracted from Phegan and she holds your attention throughout the performance. The sound design is crafted well and offers her words a scaffold to linger on. Good With Maps is sad but by no means melancholic. It finds a symmetry that leaves you feeling balanced between worlds both real and imagined.”
    - Emily Shaddick (Australian Stage)

    Good With Maps is one of those rare and beautiful productions I dream about, where a fine writer has handed a text to a fine director who calls forth a great performance from a fine actor who inspires creatives around her to produce their best for the show. … Rounding out this great triumvirate are Alice Morgan’s beautiful designs including her murmuration of small tin foil boats, Louise Mason’s subtle lighting that seems to come up from beneath the narrative rather than impose god-like over it, and Nate Edmondson’s sound that springs into the production with alacrity and verve from a certain time and space. Good With Maps is an exquisite production, knotty, agrarian and ideologically blasphemous. It’s not easy – this is not a visit to the theatre to “chillax” – but it is untamed and necessary, lyrical and intense. I found myself hanging off every word and surprised when it reached its end. Highly recommended.”
    - Lisa Thatcher

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SLUT:
    “Director Erin Taylor has created a production much, much better than you’d expect for a one-off performance. … It’s fascinating and heart-wrenching to watch as these young women struggle to come to terms with the contradictions and immense pressures of the world they live in. I hope this production returns to Sydney at some point, because it needs to be seen.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review)

    “This production was seen as a one performance highlight of the WITS’ Festival Fatale in October last year. The audience response and critical reception were such that a return in a longer season was only a matter of time – and agile programming by Red Line at the Old Fitz. So now here it is, with its original cast intact and it’s an astonishing and unmissable experience. … Directed with great verve and nuance by Erin Taylor, Slut is a production that delivers dynamic truth and theatre with every minute of its 35. It’s colourful and honest, funny and ferocious even as one’s heart is wrenched in five different directions as the lives of young women in this society are dissected and laid bare for all to see. … A must see.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “It is a cruel existence that Lolita has to endure, and director Erin Taylor’s portrayal of that brutality is certainly vivid. The production is rhythmically precise and in its half-hour duration, we are thoroughly captivated by all that it wishes to communicate.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “Erin Taylor helms a tight, incisive production. … In this tight drama which runs just a skimpy forty minutes, Cornelius has an overhanging plot which comes starkly into play at the close. Recommended…”
    - David Kary (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “One of the works programmed for WITS’ Festival Fatale was Slut, written by multi-award-winning playwright Patricia Cornelius. The one-off staging of the piece was a sell-out success and garnered an excellent critical response. … Taylor’s staging of the production in the intimate venue makes good use of the entire space; the proximity of the actors to the 65-strong audience heightens the impact of Cornelius’ text. Additionally, Nate Edmondson has ensured the action that unfolds is always suitably and meaningfully underscored.”
    - Tim Garratt (Theatre People)

    “According to the contestants on this year’s series of Masterchef, 30 minutes is not long enough to infuse a dish with the flavour punch the judges are looking for. But it’s more than enough time for the cast and crew of Slut, on now at the Old Fitz theatre. This whirlwind of a play is defiant, crude, charming and deeply engaging. And it takes just 35 minutes to do its work. … The musical score underpinning the show is well curated and interacts seamlessly with the dialogue, and the lighting design is subtle but hits all the right notes.”
    - Emily Saint-Smith (The AU Review)

    “A fast paced reflection on the ways we police women’s sexuality, the show is a punch in the gut delivered by a taut, finely tuned ensemble of young women. … Sound by Nate Edmondson sets the pace, although the rapid fire movement of the cast and delivery of their lines is what keeps us hooked while making excellent use of the theatre space. All this, in just under 35 minutes.”
    - Joanna O’Hara (Theatre Now)

    “It’s the perfect time then for Patricia Cornelius’ Slut, a short gut-punch of a play, to take up residence at the Old Fitz. … Taylor has found the inner musicality present in each of Cornelius’ lines, and in Slut it’s the relentless rhythm that propels us forward, unable to stop for too long on any one moment: time must keep marching on in the play like it does in our own lives. Further shaped by Nate Edmondson’s sound, which is designed to engage our hearts, the production feels like an assault, a prayer, a wake-up call. … Send your teenage sons; they might learn something. But more importantly: send every teenage girl you know. They’ll feel seen.”
    - Cassie Tongue (Time Out Sydney)

    “When I reviewed that initial staging, I wrote: ‘I hope this production returns to Sydney at some point, because it needs to be seen.’ … The production has evolved, with an extended sound design by Nate Edmondson, which matches the poetry of Cornelius’s language bar-for-bar.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review)

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THE VERY HUNGRY
CATERPILLAR SHOW
(UNITED KINGDOM):
    “There was something very peaceful and magical about this show. On face value the staging seems purposefully simple but it is clear that a lot of work has been put into producing this show with brilliant music, lighting and props. … This is a super show and is perfect if you want to introduce your younger children to the theatre…”
    - Dartford Living

    “Colour, movement, smiles, clear story telling, visual surprises and a narrative so iconically familiar that almost everyone in the audience can recite it from memory: it’s a promising mix for pre-schoolers’ show. … This isn’t the first attempt to dramatise the Eric Carle stories. Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia toured a version in 2011. Jonathan Rockefeller and his team have scaled the source material up much further and the result is a fine piece of theatre which uses the whole space and retains all the charm of the books in a fresh way.”
    - Susan Elkin (The Stage)

    “…bringing Eric Carle’s classic story to life requires some serious imagination. Luckily this production has it in spades. …the show tackles Carle’s stories with ingenuity and wit and easily has something to offer for audiences of all ages. This innovative adaptation makes for an enchanting experience that won’t leave you hungry for more.”
    - Emily Cole (What’s On Stage)

    “What do you do when you have a series of children’s books, that have sold 43 million copies, and you wish to bring them to life in a theatrical play? You get the very best ‘creatives’ to adapt it for you! The producers of The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show have done just that. Everything about this production says authenticity, creativity, learning and love. … The sound design and music composition by Nate Edmondson is simply beautiful. It effortlessly dances around the action without you even noticing it is there. … The Very Hungry Caterpillar is children’s entertainment at it’s very best!”
    - John Bowles (Live Theatre UK)

    “Parents often wonder how old children should be for their first theatre experience. Well The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show, which opened this weekend in London’s West End, is the perfect starter show for toddlers. The show takes four of Eric Carle’s stories, including his most famous, and turns them into a lovely puppet show, designed to appeal to children from two to seven. All the elements are there: brightly coloured cloths dancing across the stage, bubbles blown over the audience, beautifully crafted animal puppets and familiar rhythmic words.”
    - Nell (The Pigeon Pair And Me)

    “This is probably the best children’s show we have seen – and I don’t say that lightly. Simple but effective. With a fairly relaxed atmosphere, the audience are drawn in from the start, interacting enthusiastically, which continues throughout ending with everyone’s favourite caterpillar. … On tour for the first half of 2017, this show has become our go-to recommendation. With a musical accompaniment beautifully composed by Nate Edmondson, it is a real treat for all the senses and is definitely one not to be missed. … Congratulations to director and creator Jonathan Rockefeller and his whole team. I just hope the show gets translated into some of the 62 languages which the book has, it’s a theatrical treat every child deserves to experience.”
    - Sardines Magazine

    “I mentioned how captivated my three and five year old were, but my eight month old thoroughly enjoyed it too – the large pops of colours from the puppets and accompanying lighting kept her mesmerized, particularly during the layout of Mister Seahorse as the music, colour, bubbles and glitter provided some fantastic stimulation.”
    - Laura Mason (Essex Baby)

    “All the elements are there: brightly coloured cloths dancing across the stage, bubbles blown over the audience, beautifully crafted animal puppets and familiar rhythmic words. … From the familiar sun rise, the caterpillar wiggles his way through the story, dancing along his wooden perch and getting larger with each mouthful. The whole theatre joined in for the “But he was still hungry” line, and the older ones enjoyed counting what he had eaten each day. … At just under an hour, it’s an enchanting experience for your little ones.”
    - Rosalie Horrocks (Travel And Joyful)

    “This is undeniably children’s theatre of the highest standard… The Very Hungry Caterpillar certainly delights on all levels, particularly the reveal of the beautiful butterfly at the climax of the show, but the hidden gem of this production is the first of the series of four pieces; The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse. The combination of vibrant physical theatre, the arresting images of the numerous animals ranging from a polka-dotted donkey to a pink horse, and an uplifting musical score really drives home the message of the power of the imagination. … With wonderfully crafted storytelling and stagecraft, this is a truly spectacular theatrical offering and one which both children and adults alike cannot resist being swept away by.”
    - Clare Howdon (The Reviews Hub)

    “When a five year old rates something as 99 out of 10, you know it’s probably gone down well. The young audience at Theatre Royal Winchester giggled their way through The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show,  which featured four stories by Eric Carle. … Sixty minutes flew by, and was the perfect amount of time to keep the full attention of the audience, who were enthralled, engaged, fascinated and thoroughly entertained by the charming and beautiful performance. There was a big thumbs up from the five year old with me, and both babies in my group also enjoyed the experience, transfixed by the music and colours.”
    - Emily Roberts (Basingstoke Gazette)

    “Each of the tales is told through a mixture of music, dance, puppetry and reciting Eric Carle’s words just as they were written. The puppets have been made beautifully and are so true to Eric Carle’s original tissue paper collages that they may as well have just leaped from the page. Although the audience is of course very young, it was clear that they were all really enjoying the show as everyone was sat beautifully watching and listening, there was a lovely hum of chatter as children excitedly talked about the things they saw on stage, Amy included. She spent much of the show sat on the edge of her seat utterly mesmerised. (It was as much of a pleasure for me to watch her enjoying it as it was to watch the show itself).”
    - Colette (Going On An Adventure)

    “The show actually covers four of Carle’s stories, each engagingly told through the use of some amazing puppets, very vivid lighting and lots and lots of movement. My granddaughter, who only recently turned one, sat riveted for most of the show, loving the non-stop action. … The Majestic Theatre in Darlington is the perfect venue for this very colourful and visually engaging show. It is intimate, relaxed and ideal to cater for children who might otherwise feel a little intimidated by a more austere theatre. That sense of relaxation spread to the parents too and, as such, everyone was able to sit back, kick back and wallow in good old-fashioned story telling brought right up to date.”
    - Andrew Bramfitt (What’s On North East)

    “There was plenty of gasps and excitement from the young audience from the outset as an array of 75 amazing, hand-operated puppets were cleverly manipulated to faithfully bring these stories to life on stage. Each story ran seamlessly into the next, keeping the little ones mesmerised from beginning to end. … You know when a show is a success when your 2-year-old daughter is asking ‘again mummy?’ So if you’re looking for a fun treat for the little one’s this half term, book yourself seats for 50 minutes of pure magic and amazement.”
    - Sharon Wallace (Essential Surrey & SW London)

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MARAT/SADE:
    “I left boiling over with excitement, enthusing about the quality and huge, but completely realised, ambition of what I had just seen, filled again with wonderment at the genius of Weiss’s writing and the imagination that had yielded this truly remarkable concept. Yes, this had been a performance for the ages. … It’s certainly not a musical, indeed far from it, but it must also be remembered that Marat/Sade is very much a play with music — and that there is considerable singing, led by the brilliant quartet of Cucurucu (Irene Sarrinikolaou), Polpoch (Patrick Howard), Rossignol (Debra Bryan) and Kokol (Tim de Sousa). Their animated performances are simply superb. … I’ll just urge you to go see it. It rates among the best theatre I’ve seen. Very much thumbs up.”
    - John Rozentals (Oz Baby Boomers)

    “Also noteworthy is Nate Edmondson’s original music, thoroughly creative, with a welcome exuberance adding texture and depth to the staging. Performed to a backing track, we are struck by the beauty of the score’s arrangement, and are left hankering for an opportunity to hear the songs sung completely live in tandem with musicians.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “This production of Marat/Sade is well executed with fine performances, an eye-catching exciting set and complex detailed behind the scenes work. Of special note is Nate Edmondson’s sound and the truly brilliant score. The songs are thrilling, and immediately evoke a need for more. This production has enlisted a long detailed list of contributors and it shows from the broad multifaceted talents of the cast through to the psych consultant enlisted to assist the cast with their tough subject matter, this is a well thought out, beautifully executed production that rewards the close listener with nuances far beyond the original playwright’s intention. It is a stand out in a stellar year. Highly recommended.”
    - Lisa Thatcher

    “Productions values are first rate, from Tom Bannerman’s excellent set, through Spiros Hristias’ lighting, composer Nate Edmondson’s score and sound design and costumes by Nicola Block. Chaotic, rambunctious, percussive and provocative, Marat/Sade is a theatrical bull untethered and let loose among political and economic sacred cows and a whole herd of social injustice.”
    - Richard Cotter (Australian Stage)

    “Peter Weiss’ intricately written play about rebellion and counter rebellion, profiteering and war, and the cavernous gulf between the rich and poor and the ruled and the oppressed comes to disconcerting new life in this incredible production directed by Barry French. … Leading the ensemble in song to the stunning compositions by Nate Edmondson are Irene Sarrinikolaou, Tim De Sousa, Debra Bryan and Patrick Howard. Their strength and energy are a vital part of the performance. These are but a few of the twenty-one strong cast who have worked so closely with Barry French to achieve his vision of a new and more contemporary production of a play that is so well-known, but so seldom performed. It is a vibrant, confronting piece of theatre that moves from song to sadness, anger to failure and despair with gripping passion. Barry French, his cast and crew and the New Theatre are to be congratulated on this bold, theatrical production.”
    - Carol Wimmer (Stage Whispers)

    “The radical staging consists of a large cage confining the cast, who portray a strange assortment of characters burning with energy. In between monologues they effectively break away into songs which resonate the themes and timeless lessons of the play. This is a dramatic theatrical production which will evoke laughter as the comedic elements of the play transpire, leading to an eruption of emotions as the main themes are revealed in the explosive finale.”
    - Mark Morellini (Alt Media)

    “A madcap meta-musical repurposing historic cruelty for the new age, Marat/Sade is a fantastic experience for audiences to get up close and personal with. … Marat/Sade drips with ambition, which each element truly reached. …Nate Edmondson’s composition is still in my head a solid week post attendance. A thoroughly strong spectacle with a message that might be uncomfortable, but remains important for audiences to be engaged with, galvanised by and spurred to action of any kind.”
    - Brodie Paparella (Broadway World)

    “New Theatre’s production of what they – and we – will call Marat/Sade is an explosive, political work about class struggle. … The anti-realism of the rousing musical intervals further Brechtian influence, almost like a distorted version of Les Miserables. … The compelling and engrossing narrative transports you to a world both familiar and surreal. This city could do with seeing more works like it.”
    - Jo Bradley (Aussie Theatre)

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THAT GOLDEN GIRLS SHOW! (UNITED STATES):
    “Super fans of the show will definitely enjoy spending time with these characters. If the chorus of folks singing along to the opening theme at the top of the show is any indication, their ranks are sizable.”
    - Zachary Stewart (Theatre Mania)

    “Nate Edmondson’s (Composition and Sound Design) pre-show soundtrack includes some old favorites – from A-ha’s “Take On Me” to Bonnie Tyler’s “Total Eclipse of the Heart,” and Rick Astley’s “Never Gonna Give You Up” (a reminder of its pre-meme existence) to Madonna’s “Like a Virgin.” As the lights dimmed, the familiar tones of Andrew Gold’s “Thank You for Being a Friend” blasted out of the speakers, prompting some audience members to sing along, doing their best Cynthia Fee. Make no mistake: this show is all shoulder pads and bright colors, glamour and sass, puppets and meta humor (jokes about puppets and the episodic nature of sitcoms abound) – and yet, it feels just as fresh, modern, and daring as it does familiar.  And by the end of this theme song instrumental, you could practically feel it in the air that we were already hooked.”
    - Dianne Gebauer (NY Theatre Guide)

    “Picture it. A theater in Union Square. A packed audience immediately sings along to the iconic theme song of “The Golden Girls.” And then Sophia Petrillo, Blanche Devereaux, Dorothy Zbornak, and Rose Nylund parade in. In puppet form. Will the show be a hit or will it be tossed out in the seas of Sicily? That Golden Girls Show! is the puppet parody you never knew you desperately needed.”
    - Michael Block (Theatre In The Now)

    “When the lights dim and that theme song plays, sans lyrics, the audience can’t help singing along. A couple of nervous voices, at first tentative, are joined by more and more until the entire audience seems to vocalize as one, “Thank you for being a fri-e-e-end.” On one hand, it’s remarkable to witness, as a sense of communion that total is rare at any show these days. On the other, though, it’s no surprise at all, as that was indeed the mission statement of The Golden Girls (NBC, 1985 to 1992), and certainly is of this fuzzy valentine, which was conceived, written, and directed by Jonathan Rockefeller. Everything about this ultra-faithful entertainment suggests that Rockefeller, and anyone who attends, want to thank the show not for its frank (maybe too-frank?) depiction of mature women navigating their twilight years, but for being a beacon of laughter and hope in a world where that kind of stability is rarely a sure thing. Beyond the tunes—the scene transition and even end credits music sound as though they could have been lifted wholesale (Nate Edmondson is credited with composition and sound design—the sunny set (by David Goldstein) is a pitch-perfect recreation of the living room and kitchen where most of the action took place. (Sorry, though, there’s no lanai.) Had Rockefeller wanted this to look and feel more like the real thing, I don’t know that he could have swung it.”
    - Matthew Murray (Talkin’ Broadway)

    “You know you have a welcoming crowd when the audience begins singing your theme song before the lights have even come up. Such was the case the night I saw That Golden Girls Show—A Puppet Parody. Jonathan Rockefeller’s puppet-filled tribute to the beloved 80s sitcom. No sooner had the familiar chords of the show’s opening tune began to play, than the entire audience joined in to sing, “Thank you for being a friend.”
    - Lisa Huberman (New York Theatre Review)

    “You hear upbeat music playing in the lobby and the theater prior to the show beginning, which puts you in a good mood as you wait for this 90-minute puppet parody of The Golden Girls television show to begin. “Gloria,” “It’s Raining Men,” and “Like A Virgin” greet the “girls, gays and grannies” who have been invited for a walk down memory lane. Very familiar themes and zingers, most of which have been drawn directly from the 180 episodes are presented here by speaking humans carrying hand puppets Avenue Q style.”
    - Dr. Thomas Robert Stevens (Applause! Applause!)

    “Nostalgia quickly sets in upon entering the theater. … When the opening theme song, “Thank You for Being a Friend,” started playing, the audience could not help but sing along.”
    - Nathan Harding (Off Off Online)

    “For devotees of The Golden Girls, there were numerous laugh out loud sequences and big guffaws and recollections of those days of yesteryear that brought great pleasure to so many and still does via the on-going repeats on television. In fact, the audience gleefully sang the theme song before the show even began!”
    - Sandi Durrell (Theater Pizzazz)

    “The vibe is electric. If the set, a near replica to that of The Golden Girls, isn’t enough to get you in the mood, the audience singing along to the opening theme song will. As the familiar punch lines roll in, there is no doubt that we are back in Miami circa 1985 with those memorable girls of Emmy Award-winning TV: Blanche, Rose, Dorothy, and Sophia. … Die-hard fans of The Golden Girls will delight in the familiarity of the production, while others will be entertained and fascinated while discovering the inner workings of “The Great Herring War” and may even become enlightened to the problem-solving abilities of cheesecake. If the original Golden Girls knew you were attending this puppet parody production, they would surely “thank you for being a friend.””
    - Tania Fisher (Stage Buddy)

    “Picture it…wicker furniture with floral cushions in soft, pastel hues, the sound of canned violins, and the shenanigans of four women you’d swear were your best friends despite whatever age difference may exist between you.”
    - Naveen Kumar (Towelroad)

    “Nate Edmondson’s compositions sound exactly like the sitcom’s incidental music, and his sound design is totally solid.”
    - David Barbour (Lighting & Sound America)

    “When I got to the theater, I truly expected an old crowd, seniors who were devoted fans who were coming back to relive the ‘olden days’ of the great Golden Girls. What I saw was the most age-diverse crowd filling this beautiful intimate theater. Not only were many of them younger than my kids, as soon as the music played, everyone chimed in with the words, with enthusiasm I’ve rarely seen. What a hoot! …although three of those lovely Golden Girls have passed on, I felt, for that hour and a half, that I was seeing the Golden Girls in person, and just loving it!”
    - Ellen Eichelbaum (Splash Magazine)

    That Golden Girls Show! may be the only show running right now that begins with an audience sing-along; as the lights go down and a karaoke version of “Thank You For Being A Friend” starts to play, the audience tentatively, then eagerly, joins in. It’s clear what we’re all here for—the joy of revisiting a favorite sitcom, with four characters who never fail to make us laugh.”
    - Dan Dinero (Theatre Is Easy)

    That Golden Girls Show! A Puppet Parody is pretty silly and we had a great time experiencing it together. … We giggled at the theme show music at the top of the show and the interstitial music as well.”
    - Tari Stratton (Magical MissTari Tour)

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REMEMBERING PIRATES:
    “The design by Alicia Clements features a back wall with two doors at either end of a long oblong curtained window that rustles and flutters with a ‘wind’, it, suggestively lit for dramatic tension by Daniel Barber, with a Sound Composition and vocal Design atmospherically creating a ‘real’ past world of news bulletins concerning a lost child, with the magic music of the eerie otherworld of imagination, by Nate Edmondson.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Poignant, thrilling, terrifying and thought provoking, the latest offering from Darlinghurst Theatre Company will have your pulse racing and heart breaking as the Darling house is revisited decades after where Barrie left off. … Along with building the suspense, Katelyn Shaw’s sound design incorporates the television and radio announcements that gradually reveal the event that has haunted the family for years and the pieces slowly start to fit. … Remembering Pirates is an engaging and heartbreaking thriller that puts a different twist on the classic children’s story. This short work will have you guessing right to the end and change the way you see the stories we’ve been told as children.”
    - Jade Kops (Broadway World)

    “Harley’s play is a dark retelling of Barrie’s original story of the boy who never grew up. A far cry from the lighthearted, sanitised Disney version we’ve come to know. This understated production is rife with tension from beginning to end, and offers some beautiful performances.”
    - Alana Kaye (Theatre Now)

    “There is much to admire in how the production works with both surreal and naturalistic elements, blurring the boundaries between the two, to formulate a world that keeps us guessing. Its dreamlike atmosphere is created well…”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “The great strength of the show was in the directing, the designing and the acting. … The set design with its wind-blown shadows behind the window’s curtains was genuinely magical.  Like the characters, I found myself obsessed with thinking there were figures out there – until there really was one.  With eerie lighting, sound effects, and thunder and lightning, dramatic tension built – until the whole wall and window finally came crashing down in a symbolic collapse of childhood memory into harsh adult reality.”
    - Frank McKone (Canberra Critics Circle)

    “The sense of disquiet is raised at the outset with a jumble of ill-defined yet ominous street sounds, radio announcements, news items, snatches of music and other aural detritus (Nate Edmondson – score, Katelyn Shaw – sound). …Remembering Pirates is a play and production that intrigues and raises glitters of tempting questions in the imagination – just like Tinkerbelle’s fairy dust!”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “It’s this building tension that drives the play, directed by Iain Sinclair as something between a thriller and elegiac portrait of family trauma. Alicia Clements’ production design, in tandem with sound and lighting by Katelyn Shaw and Daniel Barber, conjure a dreamlike, seemingly perpetual twilight, with breezes causing the curtains to flutter and part as though in anticipation of an otherworldly arrival.”
    - Cassie Tongue (Time Out Sydney)

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A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM:
    “Brutal flashes of light and sound open this stark vision of Shakespeare’s comedy, retina-searing blasts illuminating a male dancer in black sequinned underwear (who later turns out to be Matthew Backer as Puck) writhing to a sad rendition of Gershwin’s Summertime – a musical motif that returns throughout the play. … The frightening dystopia of the early scenes, saturated in overwrought sound…disintegrates into dream-like absurdity…”
    - Angus McPherson (Limelight Magazine)

    “Also deadly serious are all the production’s design aspects. Chris Williams’ music and Nate Edmondson’s sound design hold us firmly in their dictatorial insistence for dramatic tension… On stage is a morbid world, resplendently manufactured to satisfy our need for an art that is carnal, wild and audacious. …what is achieved here is an instance of magic rarely witnessed, and unlikely to be seen very soon again. Wonderful for its uniqueness, and its gutsy approach to the most time-honoured of classics, this is excellent theatre that reminds us how good it is to be alive, at a time when the ephemeral art form can thrive so brilliantly, and we are here to catch it.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “A stirring soundscape (Nate Edmondson with composer Chris Williams) rumbles throughout and Damien Cooper’s lighting, initially at least, adds powerfully to the threat.”
    - Martin Portus (Stage Whispers)

    “The woods are an orgiastic place, not too far from a Berlin sex club, crossed with an eclectic range of visual cues. … Chris Williams has composed some brilliantly unsettling music, and Nate Edmondson’s sound design amplifies the dialogue smartly, melding the words into a pulsing soundscape. … This is a production which is constantly engaging and intriguing, inviting you to lean forward and wonder what the company might pull out next. … There are enough moments of absolute magic, both from the performances and Williams’ sense of showmanship, to keep the audience entertained, and force them to reconsider this very familiar work.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review)

    “In cahoots with his design team, Williams has certainly succeeded in making this regularly performed play (this is my fifth Dream as a Herald writer) strange and unpredictable again. Composer Chris Williams’ wall-to-wall underscore contributes strongly to the densely spooky mood. Woozy passages of Gershwin’s Summertime, crooned by Matthew Backer’s emcee-like Puck, serve as a Lynchian leitmotif. Dark club beats lend the production a pulse. When Bottom is transformed into an ass, Ligeti’s Lux Aeterna (forever associated with 2001: A Space Odyssey) creeps into the mix.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “Shakespeare’s silly ass comedy gets a dash of Gershwin in the Kip Williams’ STC production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The use of the song Summertime, from ‘Porgy and Bess’, could be considered a cheesy choice, a gimmick, but it works here as a musical leitmotif, summoning both the summer of the time of the action, and, through several orchestrations and refrains, a sense of simmering sensuality. Tonally, Williams could have cribbed another tune from the show, It Ain’t Necessarily So. Kip uses another popular song to fun effect, Buck Ram’s Only You, sung by Titania in Eartha Kittish tone to serenade and seduce Bottom in her spellbound state of wanting to mate with a mule. That bestiality underscores the nightmare quality of this Dream, a grim fairy tale where the fairies are malignant mischief makers, lewd and lascivious gremlins, convenors of carnal carnage.”
    - Richard Cotter (Australian Stage)

    “Sex as a tool of power is the theme here, and one that the staging goes all-out to emphasise. Early scenes are played out with Crucible-like seriousness, the men in stern suits and hoods passing judgement and the women in constricting bridal veils and 1950s wigs, all to the ominous thrumming of Chris Williams’ music. … It’s at once anarchic and tightly controlled: mesmerising, funny, gory, sexy, confronting.”
    - Nick Dent (Time Out Sydney)

    “Kip Williams’ contemporary-yet-enchanting take on Shakespeare’s greatest comedy grips audiences from the first scene. … The design approach is perhaps the most radically inventive and incisive element of this staging. … Much of this fiercely intelligent staging challenges our expectations of this play: it is, of course, magical and yet somehow laced with a dark, sinister energy.”
    - Tanya Rae (The Music)

    “The darkness inherent in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream is embraced in the first half of Kip William’s vision of the work for Sydney Theatre Company, now showing at the Opera House. It’s magnetically tense and discomforting, the performers often running across and around the stage, the action driven by an unrelenting, low-end warble courtesy of composer Chris Williams.”
    - Chris Hook (The Daily Telegraph)

    “The production is underscored by dark, throbbing music by Chris Williams.”
    - John McCallum (The Australian)

    “Mr Williams has conjured with his Designers – Set Design, Robert Cousins; Costume Design, Alice Babidge; Lighting Design, Damien Cooper; Composer, Chris Williams, Sound Design, Nate Edmondson – a scary post-modernist space filled with Hieronymus Bosch-like images of hellish deformity filtered through a contemporary sensibility evoking the work of artists such as Matthew Barney, Leigh Bowery or Cindy Sherman, that take us into a world of nightmare rather than dream. On a stripped-back, white floored stage with all the (three) walls demarcated with a strip of white some five feet or so tall, edged sharply into black, with lighting of blazing white flashing, and start to finish ominous music backing the activities of this theatrical vision, behind a proscenium-wide scrim-gauze, a figure begins the play, back-to-us, singing verses from Gershwin’s Porgy And Bess.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Chris Williams’ score underlies most of the play, and it is a musical world of deep bass and gloomful thrums.  Everything is tense and in stasis with his soundscape.”
    - Tomas Boot (Arts Hub)

    “Kip Williams’ creative team contribute quality work. … I found composer Chris Williams’ work particularly effective, underscoring and commentating on the action well. … This is a wondrous dream that one simply doesn’t want to end.”
    - David Kary (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “At the very opening of the production the pitch-black room flashes in a single strobe light and a heavy bass resonates through the audience. Puck is seen in these moments of lighting, his back to us and his body moving along with the music. Again the room returns to pitch black, again the strobe flashes to illuminate Puck, and the deep bass continues. Amidst all this Backer begins to sing Gershwin’s “Summertime”, and his voice is eerie, powerful and perfect.”
    - Kat Czornij (The AU Review)

    “Chris Williams’ score, and Nate Edmondson’s sound design are almost always present, and bombard us with drones, pulses, heart-tripping beats, and snatches of Ligeti. …Titania’s glamoured awakening – to the strains of Elvis Presley’s ‘Only You’ – works a treat, not least because Paula Arundell’s rich voice and her shimming gold gown seem to be one and the same, and work in conjunction with the lyrics to enhance the moment.”
    - Glenn Saunders (The Spell Of Waking Hours)

    “I think the clarity of purpose in this production has been carried through in the stage design, lighting and use of music, making all these elements into an integrated artistic work. Shakespeare might be surprised at some modern devices, like the smart phone which answers a crucial question, or Puck singing ‘Summertime, and the living is easy…’, but I’m sure Shakespeare would be pleased that what he hoped to do for his audience in the days of the Queen’s lover being executed among all the other excruciating behaviours of his times, has been faithfully translated for our modern yet still so unchanging times. This is Shakespeare, the artist of great intellect. … This production is a real dream, and not be missed.”
    - Frank McKone (Canberra Critics Circle)

    “The Athenian women wear sombre, conservative wedding gowns – and even the stage itself is veiled for the opening scenes. This is augmented by pulsating, eerie music (composer Chris Williams and sound designer Nate Edmondson) and excellent lighting (by Damien Cooper) – particularly striking were the first opening frames of Puck, played with eerie, malevolent joy by Matthew Backer.”
    - Claire Hansen (Shakespeare Reloaded)

    “…for me this production is invigorating and exhilarating, and all future productions will pale by comparison.”
    - Toni Carroll (Oz Baby Boomers)

    “Somewhat riskily, director Kip Williams delivers A Midsummer’s Night Dream that is less forest romp, more dark exploration of power and desire. It is an often gripping, coherent production which goes a long way to justify the play getting another outing on a mainstream stage. Boldly messing with the Bard’s feel-good comedy, Williams in collaboration with his team of designers – Robert Cousins (set), Alice Babidge (costume) Damien Cooper (lighting), Chris Williams (composer) and Nate Edmondson (sound) – takes a very physical and visually striking approach. …this most unusual Dream has stayed with me for weeks.”
    - Veronica Hannon (Gay News Network)

    “Right from the moment the curtain goes up and a buff male in sequinned knickers sings a slow and moody Summertime we know the climate of this Midsummer’s night is sultry. … I really enjoyed Kip Williams and STC’s darker take on William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”
    - Fiona Prior (Henry Thornton)

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LEAVES:
    “Chant has created a simple production, with lovely set design by Isabel Hudson (also on costumes) and music by Nate Edmondson. There is an underlying sense of melancholy running through Leaves.”
    - Alana Kaye (Theatre Now)

    “Situations in Leaves are volatile, so corresponding emotions are kept under tight containment by director Rachel Chant for a work that is elegant, melancholic and extremely thoughtful. It is a production full of nuance, aided by the considerable talents of music composer Nate Edmondson and lighting designer Sian James-Holland, both providing unobtrusive but essential elements of movement and tension to the piece.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “Nate Edmondson’s soundtrack makes a strong contribution throughout. All up, another feather in the cap for the Kings Cross Theatre, which hasn’t put a foot wrong in this, its first year.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    Leaves is peppered with plenty of moments of tenderness. …the production successfully constructs a credible world that simultaneously exudes pain and warmth. You may emerge from the theatre swimming wistfully in memory, a little sombre but also hopeful about the future.”
    - Shon Ho (Alt Media)

    “This quietly intense, melancholic and compelling play grabs us and forces us to listen. With its Irish gift of the blarney it is at times lyrically moving at others quite emotionally tense. … The soundscape by Nate Edmondson is haunting, and the lighting design by Sian James-Holland wonderfully complements the action. This was a gripping, compelling production.”
    - Lynne Lancaster (Sydney Arts Guide)

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SAVAGES:
    “Backed by Julia Cotton’s pacey stage movement, the result is a theatrical, rhythmic build in tension and threat. Nate Edmondson’s rumbling sounds add to the unease, as the men shift from sentimental, even amusing fantasies about their mums and the best of womanhood, to angry hatred and entitlement. …this sophisticated production successfully makes uncomfortable drama from the maudlin horrors of the pack.”
    - Martin Portus (Stage Whispers)

    “The set which abstractly represents the cruise ship is cleverly constructed and lit, with music and sound used effectively to mark the changes in mood – and even make us laugh again in a drunken karaoke scene.  Until the laughter fades and we see the reality.”
    - Frank McKone (Canberra Critics Circle)

    “There was plenty of dreaming going on, as they escape, however briefly, the mundanity of their depressing lives. Blaring sound design by Nate Edmondson and glaring lighting by Sian James-Holland and Cameron Menzies further enhances this in your face play, lighting is unforgiving and the music a relentless cacophony, but amazingly effective as we are pushed out of our comfort zone. Director Tim Roseman has let the dogs loose and the result is superb.”
    - The Buzz From Sydney

    “Director Tim Roseman has marshalled superb work from his collaborators, the aforementioned cast and production designer as well as movement director, Julia Cotton, lighting designer, Sian James-Holland, assisted by Cameron Menzies, and composer and sound designer, Nate Edmondson. Unflinching, uncompromising, unpalatable, unforgettable, Savages is a remarkable and searing theatrical experience.”
    - Richard Cotter (Australian Stage)

    Savages is 70 tautly-wrought minutes performed by an ensemble of four excellent actors and directed with precision and compassion by Tim Roseman. … Savages is clever, absorbing, funny, touching and awful by turns. … Towards the end of this gripping production I began to feel really scared and was selfishly glad there were four or five rows of audience between me and them. The constant movement of the men (choreographed by movement director Julia Cotton) is punctuated and enhanced by Nate Edmondson’s sound and composition. … Darlinghurst is to be congratulated for staging this production and audiences should flock to it. Recommended.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “…a wild and drunken karaoke performance of When A Man Love A Woman by all four men is very funny and cruelly ironic. … But the impact of that script is enormous. It left me feeling physically ill, not because there’s much physical violence described (and there’s none performed) but because the attitudes played out on stage are sickening. The cumulative effect of hearing them expressed both explicitly and implicitly for 75 minutes is overwhelming; a necessary jolt to the system.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review)

    “All four actors are committed, credible and energised, and the ominous sense of events taking a darker turn is superbly enhanced by Nate Edmondson’s eerie music.”
    - John Shand (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “Roseman does excellent work in creating distinct segments out of what could easily be a singular poetic murmur, by providing a captivating plot manufactured with a great variety of tones, moods and emotions. Design elements are intricately dynamic, with Nate Edmondson’s very exhaustive and complex work on sound design playing an integral role in conveying subtexts and psychological undercurrents, and Sian James-Holland’s lights keeping visuals amusing with constant shifts in colour and movement. Also notable is Jeremy Allen’s evocative set design, which provides an intense intimacy to the small cast, and shapes the space in a way that allows acoustics to be perfectly established for every word of dialogue to ring with crystal clarity.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    Savages is brutal, confronting, and downright terrifying in its honest portrayal of a large sector of Australian society. … Sian James-Holland’s lighting and Nate Edmondson’s sound and music (composer and sound design) heighten the mood with blackouts and music signalling scene changes and a row of coloured LED’s within the portholes that line the rear wall changing the time of day and the tone of the scenes.”
    - Jade Kops (Broadway World)

    “The Set Design by Jeremy Allen, is a metaphoric intimation to a cruise ship and has a Lighting Design by Sian James-Holland that creates the atmospheres of the journey of the men, accompanied by a detailed, supportive Sound Design and Composition by Nate Edmondson. Savages is a confronting work and worth experiencing for its theatricality.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Roseman has brought together a wonderful team to make this production what it is. Jeremy Allen’s elegant set suggests the undulating deck of a ship, with white railings and wooden floors with hatches concealing props. Nate Edmondson’s music and sound paired with Sian James-Holland’s lights (who was assisted by Cameron Menzies) are hugely evocative and well-executed. This is truly a gripping production. While I can’t say it was likeable, or even palatable, it certainly shouldn’t be missed.”
    - Alana Kaye (Theatre Now)

    “By the end you feel palpably anxious and viscerally frightened — it’s a feeling I’m certain most women or non-heteronormative men can relate to. Composer and Sound Designer, Nate Edmondson, along with Lighting Designer, Sian James-Holland, should be commended for their contribution, both adding significantly to the crescendo of baneful behaviour.”
    - Sophie Gillfeather-Spetere (Arts Hub)

    “Raw, gripping and engulfing from the moment the men stepped onto the stage. … The production opens with the lights dimmed, a heavy drum beat, and the performers taking to the stage in an animalistic, pack like movement. As the drum beat settles, the lights brighten to show the 4 men – Craze, Rabbit, George, and Runt – gazing out into the audience in a trance-like state. … You find yourself immersed in the rollercoaster ride of emotion that they take you on, believing every twist and turn as it unfolds before you.”
    - Erin Hunter (Sydney Social 101)

    “Opening with a blast of light and sound, we meet four thirty-something Aussie men, about to embark on the ‘trip of a lifetime’ aboard a cruise ship. … This is a production that fully utilises all the elements of theatre – sound, lighting, set, script, and physical performance. What’s more, they work together smartly to create a cohesive, slick production where nothing is redundant.”
    - Emily Saint-Smith (The AU Review)

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THE VERY HUNGRY
CATERPILLAR SHOW
(UNITED STATES):
    “Created by Jonathan Rockefeller, this Australian production, which will mesmerize audience members as young as 2, doesn’t so much adapt four of Mr. Carle’s picture books as animate them. You could swear that the stories’ creatures, in their author’s signature style of hand-painted tissue paper collage, had stretched, stood up, shaken themselves and lumbered, leapt, sailed or flown off the page… Designed by Eric Wright and executed by the Puppet Kitchen, these beasts range from glowing fireflies, mounted on rods and held aloft, to a jointed, life-size polka-dot donkey that dances a hoedown with Weston Long, a puppeteer who’s a stand-in for Mr. Carle. (Nate Edmondson composed the background music, which ranges from sweetly lyrical to comically percussive.)”
    - Laurel Grabber (New York Times)

    “The show was very creative and we think it is great for kids ages 10 and younger. The show was very colorful and the music was just a perfect match to the actors and the puppets! … We rate it five smiles for all children. … What are you waiting for? Go and watch the ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show’! You will have a great time!”
    - Kidsday Reporters (Newsday)

    “Based on four of Eric Carle’s classic books … Jonathan Rockefeller’s production which began in Australia is making its New York premiere. So grab your youngster and head straight to the 47th Street Theatre for this family-friendly show with its 75 colorful puppets. It’s faithful to the original stories that kids have loved for decades. The puppeteers use a light-handed touch and keep the puppets moving across the stage at a brisk clip, inviting the audience into a world where magical animals have adventures and do extraordinary things. … At scene’s end Weston puts down his paintbrush, kicks up his heels and does a jazzy dance with a polka-dot donkey.”
    - Deirdre Donovan (CurtainUp)

    “Adapting children’s books into musicals can be tricky. It’s a delicate balance between recreation and saccharine productions. But in a 60-minute show for toddlers that offers 75 puppets, The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show, faithfully adapts four of Eric Carle’s beloved books off-Broadway at the 47th Street Theater. … Created by Jonathan Rockefeller, the stories are enhanced by a charming score. … ‘The Very Lonely Firefly’ captures the slightly spooky ambiance of the book. The lone firefly looks for other fireflies and keeps following lights as noises from a dog and a cat disturb the peaceful night. At one point, he follows fireworks that are depicted by sound effects and streamers a puppeteer throws over the audience and pulls back again. … This is a colorful production, loaded with gentle messages wrapped in an engaging presentation. If you’re looking for young kids’ introduction to theater, this is it.”
    - Fern Siegel (Huffington Post)

    “It’s never easy to successfully adapt a popular book for stage or film (the expectations!), nor to keep a theater full of toddlers and preschoolers engaged and seated for an hour. Yet the latest stage adaptation of Eric Carle’s beloved The Very Hungry Caterpillar, playing in NYC this winter, does all that and more. … The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show retells four iconic Carle tales with 75 handcrafted large-scale puppets, four actors who double as puppeteers and narrators and subtle but lyrical music that readies the audience for the animal magic about to appear on stage. It’s earnest, colorful, artsy and will hold your kid in awe for 60 solid minutes. This sweet production, which first opened in Australia, begins and ends by an actor holding up one of the popular board books it retells… With minimal narration, the production is a visual feast that relies on the bright colors and personalities of Carle’s characters to take center stage. Colorful fluttering scarves, neon-hued puppets created in the illustrator’s familiar collage-style that prance about and flashy stage lighting, combined with clever soundscapes like crickets and firecrackers, transport the audience to the inner pages of each children’s story. Music composed by Nate Edmondson helps fuel the action and alert viewers to upcoming events with attention to rhythm and movement rather than verse. The orange elephant of The Artist Who Painted A Blue Horse gets a long, slow trombone as kids in the audience laugh and point to his impressive trunk, while the trumpet fish of Mister Seahorse arrive with Jamaican steel drums and trumpets sounding in the background.”
    - Rose Gordon Sala (Mommy Poppins)

    “When I was invited to attend a preview performance of The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show last weekend at the 47th Street Theatre with my (almost) five-year-old daughter, I was excited and hesitant. Eric Carle’s artwork is iconic. His colorful tissue paper collage illustrations fill his books with wonder. How would his two-dimensional creations transfer to the stage? The answer is: Beautifully. At times, I felt like someone had scanned the pages of Mr. Carle’s books through a (very) colorful 3-D printer. … An adventurous mother sat next to me with her 6-month old baby who was having his first theatrical experience, and he wasn’t the only baby in the audience. And yet the production was just as captivating for the older kids in the audience as well. … The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show beautifully captures Eric Carle’s spirit and creativity, and my daughter and I left the theater with the same sense of brightness and wonder projected through his artwork in his books. We both highly recommend the show, and hope you will go with your children and have the same magical journey through Mr. Carle’s world.”
    - Vonnie Murad (Macaroni Kid)

    “The first has an artist moving one color at a time through many of the animals found throughout Carle’s books — including a purple fox, an orange elephant and a black polar bear — with each one taking the stage as a dancing puppet. The section moves at an easy pace with gently pulsating music and gets kids into the groove of the show. The framework for each animal’s appearance is repeated, but every puppet brings a little jolt of surprise when it comes onstage. From there the show tells more straightforward stories: Mister Seahorse, The Very Lonely Firefly and, of course, one about a certain caterpillar that eats his way through a ton of colorful food before turning into a butterfly. My kindergartner got excited about each new onstage transformation, and the younger kids around us all found plenty to enjoy. And by keeping the whole thing to an hour, no one in the audience lost interest or got overtired. (The adults seemed to be having a pretty good time, too!)”
    - Brian Glaser (Baristanet)

    “Bringing children’s stories to the stage tends to either be a commercial extravaganza like Sesame Street Live or retreads of Grimm’s Fairy Tales. A refreshing exception is The Very Hungry Caterpillar, which takes four books that just about every toddler has been given by a grandparent, aunt or uncle, and through a creative use of puppetry, brings the works of illustrator/author Eric Carle to life. … On the technical side, Raul Abrego’s set is beautifully flexible, an artist’s studio changes to an underwater world in the blink of an eye. Nicholas Rayment’s lighting and Nate Edmondson’s original music flesh the experience out. … The result was a house full of kids having a great time. They were encouraged to laugh, clap, call out, in short, to be kids, and they did. The tag line in The Very Hungry Caterpillar is “but he was still hungry.” By the end of that section, the kids were reciting the lines ahead of the actors just as surely as a Bruce Springsteen audience will sing the chorus of “Born in the USA.” … As parents and grandparents, we owe it to our little ones to expose them to the arts and allow their natural interests to do the rest. A bad experience early on can color a whole lifetime, while a good experience can create a passion for something that pays dividends for decades. The Very Hungry Caterpillar creates little theatre fans, and that is the entire point of theatre for children. My 2-year-old granddaughter already is asking when we are going again.”
    - Jeff Myhre (NY Theatre Guide)

    “In an era when children’s entertainment is often a flamboyant bonanza constantly bombarding the senses, The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show feels refreshingly personal and unassuming. The set, costumes, and script are modest, but colorful, and the production is minimal, except for the sheer number of vibrant puppets. As a parent, I appreciated the reminder that stupefying excess is not the only way to hold kids’ attention. A good story, well told, can do it just as well. … The small-scale production feels both familiar and exciting. It begins with an announcement encouraging children to be their antsy selves and inviting them to chastise any naughty parents that pull out a cell phone during the production. The kids are also marshalled to join the story-telling and even shout out, predicting the next color, character, and so on. Given the popularity of the books, there is no lack of audience participation from the kids, but it is not distracting or obnoxious. Most of the kids actually sat still and watched the story unfold, eagerly awaiting their favorite parts. … I asked my five-year-old son if he enjoyed the show and he responded simply, “Can we see it again please?!” I’d say that’s a ‘yes.’”
    - Nathan Lents (StageBuddy)

    “Created by Jonathan Rockefeller, the show is comprised of 75 dazzling puppets, dancing and narration of the four stories. I recently saw the show with my kids and found it absolutely endearing! Everything about it is top-notch! The skilled puppeteers take turns narrating the stories and the puppets, created by The Puppet Kitchen, are beautifully done and true to the original collage illustrations in the books. … This is probably the show’s charm – it appeals to lovers of Eric Carle’s books and artwork, regardless of their age.”
    - Maytal Wichman (The Mama Maven Blog)

    “A menagerie of 75 colorful and magical puppets during a fantastical 60-minute show mesmerized the children as well as their parents and grandparents. It’s a great occasion to bring your young ones from age 2 to 9 to enjoy this show. … Imagine all this is done by enchanting puppets with dazzling colors and expertly performed by the puppeteers and actors. I highly recommend this delightful show that brought smiles and a sense of wonder to all.”
    - Laura Thompson (Loralia Global Media Ventures)

    “This is the perfect introduction to theater for little ones. … Mini thespians will shriek in awe and chime in with the cast on stage to pick the colors to come to life, including a very green lion, red alligator, curious elephant and polka-dotted donkey. Get up and dance along as a frisky fox prances on stage, and bask in the moonlight of Mr. Moon as he helps a lonely firefly help find his way back to his swarm. (My preschooler couldn’t get enough of it!).”
    - Stephanie Barnhart (Mommy Nearest)

    “This adorable production from Australia is magical with it’s puppetry and the perfect first theatre show for children. … Mister Seahorse, lets children know how fathers care for their young as eggs. it is a great message for children. Set to the tune of Jamaican steel drums and trumpets the sea never sounded so inviting. The Very Lonely Firefly used wonderful stage lighting by Nicholas Rayment and soundscapes like crickets and firecrackers by Nate Edmondson to create a nighttime world. … The good news is parents will be just as entertained as their youngsters due to the creative sets, scarves and puppets.”
    - Suzanna Bowling (Times Square Chronicles)

    The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show was as charming as children’s theater gets. It was simple but magical and the 60-minute length was the perfect length of time for toddlers. … All the kids were on the edge of their seats. Even Porter sat on our laps the entire time and watched the show without making a peep! … By the time the caterpillar and the beautiful butterfly came on stage, there was so much excitement in the theater. The entire show is well paced and contains the right elements of surprise that children really respond to. My husband, Gerard, and I enjoyed it too! I highly recommend this delightful performance.”
    - Bergen Mama

    “Each time the music changed we tried to guess what animal the artist would draw next: the green lion, pink rabbit, black polar bear, purple fox, or orange elephant who were made from puppets and walked gracefully on the stage. … For toddlers, it was magical, most kids in the audience were glued to the stage, the colors, gentle music, the soft voices of the actors, the familiarity of the pictures and very slow movements made it familiar and interesting.”
    - Liat Ginsberg (The Culture Mom)

    “The vivid images of the stories were brought to life in a brilliant manner. … The music, composed by Nate Edmondson, blends well with the performance and helps draw you into each story. … It is an excellent show to introduce kids to live children’s theatre while spending quality family time.”
    - Sai Malena Jimenez-Fogarty (Motherhood Later)

    “Each time the music changed we tried to guess what animal the music suggested before they entered the stage. Animals that were playful, sinister, or humorous; all were wonderful, colourful additions that filled the Artist’s gallery. ‘I am an Artist’, declared our clever painter and all the budding artists in the theatre broke their mesmerised silence to clap loudly.”
    - Jenny Rossiter (Weekend Notes)

    “Although Carle’s books are recommended for children aged 10 and younger, this show has a wider appeal. When you get a reaction from audience members between the ages of 2 and 82, you know that you are doing something right. … The puppets aren’t the only thing that makes this show great. The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show has both illusion and spectacle. With simple sleight-of-hand, lighting, and the old bait-and-switch routine, this show finds seemingly magical effects to produce wonder and awe. Paintings appear without real paint, confetti and light combine to create fireworks that burst into the audience, and a drum light becomes a floating moon.”
    - Bebe Fischer (Off Off Online)

    “Combining physical theatre with delicate voicework, diverting choreography, a little magic and some very skilful use of puppets, The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show is a Grade A confection: sweet, colourful, enchanting and good for lasting memories. …The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show is an absolute, unqualified triumph. … Sections based on Mister Seahorse (a beautiful story that demystifies gender roles in child rearing) and The Very Lonely Firefly (full scale Broadway musicals have struggled to have as much impact and simple joy as this tale) follow. The smallest audience members ooh and aah in an unrestrained way, the resolution of the Firefly tale being particularly affecting; the adults merely try to pretend they are not crying. … There is nothing not to like about this production. It is that perfection combination of ambition, achievement and genius. The hard working company make real theatrical magic with good storylines, committed intent and inspired vision.”
    - Stephen Collins (Live Theatre UK)

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I AM MY OWN WIFE:
    “Direction is provided by Shaun Rennie, whose outstanding use of space keeps our senses engaged and active, astutely controlling our perceptions of the show’s frequent contextual transformations, in terms of personalities, time and place. … Nate Edmondson’s complex sound design is executed with impressive refinement and is noticeably adventurous with its concepts.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “Lighting (Hugh Hamilton) and sound design (Nate Edmondson) are thoughtfully folded into a technically sharp production.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “The staging is simple and stylised (design Caroline Comino, lighting Hugh Hamilton) and the sound (Nate Edmondson) is spare and also instrumental in creating the imagery so effortlessly conjured up for the audience. … Fascinating stuff – highly recommended.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “An unseen radio discussing the Berlin Wall plays as a figure in black headscarf, pearls, button shirt and skirt and apron enters briefly before returning with a box. With a thick but feminine German accent, we start to get an insight into Charlotte’s passion for phonographs as she lovingly talks about Edison’s first recording device and her collection of 5000 cylinders. … Sound designer Nate Edmondson has bought together archive recordings of radio broadcasts and interviews along with a selection of music to emphasize the importance records played in Charlotte’s life. … I Am My Own Wife is a detailed, powerful work…”
    - Jade Kops (Broadway World)

    “She loved music and had a collection of 15,000 gramophone records and never owned a radio or TV. Crackly old gramophone music weaves through her story, taking us back to when she was a 16-year-old boy called Lothar…”
    - Mel Somerville (Alt Media)

    “Gerrard’s performance was enhanced by superb lighting design by Hugh Hamilton and sound by Nate Edmondson which transformed this show and the intimate space of the theatre and provided an enthralling night of theatre. I Am My Own Wife, with its astute observations and wry humour is a great success for director Shaun Rennie and his team.”
    - The Buzz From Sydney

    “Credit goes to Wright’s brilliant writing and this production’s reverent treatment of the play. … A beautiful production telling a special, moving story. Go see it.”
    - Maryann Wright (Australian Arts Review)

    “Shaun Rennie has directed a vibrant, textured production which allows Gerrard to shine.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review)

    “Theatre doesn’t get much better than this. … Shaun Rennie’s current production at the Old Fitz is a strong revival of  Wright’s major work. … The creative team- lighting designer Hugh Hamilton, set designer Caroline Comino, sound man Nate Edmondson and costume woman, Elise McCann- create the milieu in which he weaves his spell. … This is a memorable night in the theatre, spotlighting a unique life story.”
    - David Kary (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “The production is immaculate. The Set Design by Caroline Commo is beautiful in its forensic clarity of detail and ‘tricks’ – the clever 3D wooden jig-saw pieces, substituting for a variety of ‘properties’ in the table – the Lighting by Hugh Hamilton atmospheric, with a Sound Design by Nate Edmondson of restrained aptness. Director, Shaun Rennie, has created a very tight and lucid production … I Am My Own Wife at the Old Fitz is a production of theatrical bravura.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Shaun Rennie caters his direction to the intimate space of fortyfivedownstairs, bringing the audience right into Charlotte’s life. … Hugh Hamilton’s lighting design considers its subjects well as does Nate Edmondson’s excellent sound design. This is a production of very high quality.”
    - Adam Rafferty (Theatre People)

    “The last song I expected to hear playing over the speakers as I entered the space for I Am My Own Wife, was “I Feel Love” by Donna Summer. But the purpose is later made clear as we learn about the extraordinary and intriguing life of German transgender woman, Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, who survived both the Nazi and the Communist regime.”
    - Myron My (My About Town)

    “Doug Wright’s play I Am My Own Wife, at fortyfivedownstairs for Midsumma, is a most remarkable piece. … I loved this play. Gerrard’s subtle, sly and moving performance and the simple but ingenious staging, with a backdrop of censored Stasi files and sparse, deceptively simple furniture (design by Caroline Comino, lighting by Hugh Hamilton, sound by Nate Edmondson), combine to create an engrossing experience. Knowing that the play is based on a real person, and hearing her voice and that of Wright at the very end, left me wanting to know more about this astonishing woman. Afterwards, my friends and I found ourselves animatedly discussing the issues and puzzles of the play. It’s a terrific piece.”
    - Katie Purvis (Aussie Theatre)

    “In addition to Mr Rennie’s direction, the other artistic elements here cohere beautifully and do nothing but enhance Charlotte’s story and Mr Gerrard’s wonderful performance. … Nate Edmondson’s sound design includes numerous perfectly chosen music cues and just perceptible but ominous rumbles that stir the emotions. I’ve not seen a lot of standing ovations at 45downstairs. Mr Gerrard received one and it is thoroughly, totally merited.”
    - Michael Brindley (Stage Whispers)

    “To be as clear as can be: the show is a knockout. Absolute highest-quality, runs the emotional gamut, cuts right to the bones of humanity. Nothing short of a masterpiece. … I Am My Own Wife‘s ambitions by no means stopped at Gerrard’s performance. … A highlight of the environment installed at fortyfivedownstairs was the music player that paired beautifully with Nate Edmondson’s sound design, through his adventurous use of historically accurate sound alongside contemporary tracks, where even quality of sound varied to cement the authenticity made for a rich integrity Gerrard could stand upon. Lighting and shadow played up moments to true drama, which with Edmondson’s help gave this particularly seasoned audience member a genuine fright or five!”
    - Brodie Paparella (Broadway World)

    I Am My Own Wife is the most incredible theatrical experience; an intimate and secretive (like, a secret society downstairs underground back room Weimar Cabaret performance…oh, wait), and one of our more memorable evenings at the theatre; it’s one that I’ll treasure not only for its extraordinary story, but more so, for its captivating star performer. … Caroline Camino’s simple, sombre design, Hugh Hamilton’s moody, poor man’s lighting and Nate Edmondson’s evocative soundscape wholly support Gerrard’s multiple voices whilst remaining true to the main character’s obsessions with precious things.”
    - Xanthe Coward (XS Entertainment)

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GOOD WORKS:
    “The arch of the Eternity space is utilised neatly without over-egging its significance and Sian James-Holland’s lighting turns the space into a magical, ethereal nowhere-land. This sense is enhanced by Nate Edmondson’s soundscape and music. …Good Works is yet another reminder of what an extraordinary talent we had in Nick Enright and he is well served by this mainly very fine production. Recommended.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “Nate Edmondson’s sound and music is clean and simple highlighting an underlying innocence that the characters once had. …Good Works is a well presented, poignant and complex work about lost youth, damaged lives, abuse, betrayal, and prejudice.”
    - Jade Kops (Broadway World)

    “Iain Sinclair’s production is ravishing. Like the play itself, it doesn’t make much sense initially but eventually the meaning hits home. Some previous stagings have helped the audience follow the plot by clearly signalling when each scene takes place. Sinclair has chosen not to do this, which makes it more difficult for the audience, but proves rewarding in the end. It becomes dreamlike and so confusion is acceptable. Indeed, it’s almost like a puzzle: solving it keeps us engaged. …This is a fine production that proves the power of a well-told Australian play.”
    - Peter Gotting (Stage Whispers)

    “…it is plainly evident that a great deal of intelligent design has gone into this production, and for that alone the cast and crew should be congratulated.”
    - Dinner And A Show

    “Nate Edmondson’s soundscape and music is seamlessly atmospheric and haunting. … A most intense, thought provoking, sometimes disturbing production excellently acted.”
    - Lynne Lancaster (Arts Hub)

    “Special mention must also go to Nate Edmondson (composer and sound designer) and Hugh O’Connor (production designer) for making this such a memorable production. … Thumbs up.”
    - John Rozentals (Molong Online)

    “Sian James-Holland and Nate Edmondson round out a beautiful night of theatre with subtle lighting and sound that use the empyrean space of the Darlinghurst Theatre stage to full advantage. All this comes together under the self-assured direction of Iain Sinclair who has so very obviously loved every moment of working with this beautiful text. It is his potent navigation and his elegant treatment that bring Enright’s work to life in, one imagines, precisely the way it was intended.”
    - Lisa Thatcher

    “Nate Edmondson’s soundscape layers even more chilling complementarity to these close encounters of the horrific, depressingly familiar kind. … By rights, we shouldn’t have to wait another couple of decades for drama of this magnitude and quality. Don’t go changing, either: this a supremely well-engineered production, without the need for any tweaking of tampering of cast, or creatives.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Syke On Stage)

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A GIRL WITH SUN
IN HER EYES:
    “There are the classic tropes of said shows – a good cop/bad cop pairing, red herrings and a suspect who keeps you guessing – plus the familiar stark noir atmosphere of Scandinavian crime thrillers created by the minimal stage set-up, ominous soundtrack and strip lighting.”
    - George Nott (The Brag)

    “The best of this late night show … is the inventive scene change lighting of pulsing coloured ‘fluro-tubes’ hung on the back wall of the set by Alexander Berlage, and the vivid and exciting Sound Design by Nate Edmondson.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Sound and lights help with a sense of continuity…”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “The 80 minutes are packed with intensity as the ‘present’ events in the police precinct are interspersed with flashbacks to the events that led up to William being arrested and interrogated. Scene changes vary from either full blackout and loud music to sets being rearranged around actors before their departure.”
    - Jade Kops (Broadway World)

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MORTIDO:
    “The sombre, oppressive music by composer The Sweats hauntingly overshadows the misery of the characters’ lives.”
    - Greg Elliot (In Daily)

    “The soundscape from the Sweats is a roiling rumble punctuated by explosive scene markers.”
    - Murray Bramwell (The Australian)

    “Production design is spartan, but Geoff Cobham’s meticulously nuanced lighting design, combined with the subtle shifts in Pete Goodwin’s score, serve to effectively establish each different scene. …if hard-hitting, edgy contemporary drama is what you’re after, it doesn’t get much better than this.”
    - Benjamin Orchard (Stage Whispers)

    “Using compositions by The Sweats, Nate Edmondson’s rich soundscape, and terrific lighting design by Geoff Cobham enhance this production with clarity, atmosphere and breath-stealing tension, without ever demanding to be noticed.”
    - Nikki Fort (The Clothesline)

    “Effectively dramatic lighting (Geoff Cobham), teams nicely with sound (Nate Edmondson) and music by Franz Schubert and The Sweats ominously marking scene changes, and assisting the tension building and marking the contrasts.”
    - Peter Bleby (Aussie Theatre)

    “…the soundscape lifts, carries, and complements the action on the stage magnificently. Composed by The Sweats with Nate Edmondson as sound designer, it ranges from soft, strange rustling and rattling through rumbles and roars, thumps and thunders and wondrous percussive intensities. Mortido is a brave new work and an ambitious production which is what theatre is meant to be.”
    - Samela Harris (The Barefoot Review)

    “…a welcome jolt of adrenaline in the tail-end of a year of theatre. Exploding upon Belvoir’s corner-stage after a critically successful season in Adelaide, Mortido is equal parts crime drama, revenge tragedy, morality play, and familial drama all in one thrilling evening. … Directed by Betzien’s long-time collaborator Leticia Cáceres, Mortido is set upon a dark and atmospheric set (Robert Cousins) with moody chiaroscuro lighting (Geoff Cobham), and a furious score (THE SWEATS). Unfolding like a film, Mortido’s scenes intersect and overlap with a thrilling collision of timelines, with characters appearing in both the present and past in simultaneous moments.”
    - Glenn Saunders (The Spell Of Waking Hours)

    “With such narrative complexities, sound, set and lighting design become crucial in telling the story. The set lends its hand to visualising this new world – with mirrored tiles of a nightclub on one wall, and a Perspex screen for the play’s imaginative diversions on the other. Aural cues take us from El Camino to German nightclubs and Sydney’s Ivy bar.”
    - Emma Froggatt (The Guardian)

    “Mounted in Robert Cousins’ stage design of reflective surfaces, director Leticia Caceres does well to keep us immersed in a story that crisscrosses the globe, from Woollahra mansion to Liverpool food court, from the nightclubs of Berlin to the jungles of Bolivia. A soundtrack of thudding beats and abrasive cues composed by Pete Goodwin (AKA the Sweats) and Nate Edmondson, and Geoff Cobham’s lighting, contribute to a squeezing build of tension in the room.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “Angela Betzien’s crime thriller set in Sydney carries all the hallmarks of that town; its loud, gritty, grim and grotesque as well as great entertainment.”
    - Peter Maddern (Kryztoff Raw)

    “Robert Cousins’ black, gleaming, reflective set and Geoff Cobham’s lighting effortlessly conjure up glam mansion, luxe nitery, nowhere and elsewhere alike, with the hapless humans thrown back at themselves and the audience in some kind of unkind kaleidoscope. The action is occasionally punctuated by sound amid a soundscape-composition that pounds the body and senses (The Sweats, sound designer Nate Edmondson). All up there is every ingredient to make Mortido a memorable experience.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “…Mortido is gripping, and very exciting, with each scene holding surprises, frequently overwhelming with its keen portrayal of brutality, both physical and psychological. Composer The Sweats and Sound Designer Nate Edmondson do exceptional work with their manipulations of atmosphere. The production relies heavily on its sounds to control our responses, and the precision at which it guides our emotions through every sequence and transition is remarkable.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “Betzien cokes the furnace of the drama with a magic realism, though the magic is black, as is the humour, and the realism palpable in the atmosphere of dread. Betzien has been inspired by the ‘Golden Age’ of television and the emergence of popular crime shows to write a cycle of crime dramas, the latest of which, Mortido, feels like binge viewing a season of a series. Indeed, director Leticia Caceres employs cinematic techniques like cross fade and superimposition, deftly combining the televisual with traditional theatre craft.”
    - Richard Cotter (Australian Stage)

    Mortido is a pulsating ride around the world that ends up in Sydney, in all its various shades of entitlement and decadence.”
    - Greg Webster (Alt Media)

    “Director Leticia Cáceres says in her notes that she hopes seeing this play will be a ‘workout for the brain’. She and her team have delivered a production that is gripping from beginning to end. … The technical direction of the show is seamless. The design is pared back and subtly textured. As the show progresses, surfaces get stripped away and daubed with swirls of lipstick and blood. This is a riveting portrayal of people caught between a death wish and a dangerous impulse to tenderness that spiral one around the other. It is a wild ride.”
    - John Lavarack (Sydney Scoop)

    “Pete Goodwin, of The Sweats, provides a vivid soundtrack throughout, including an ear-popping club scene. All lovers of modern theatre should attend.”
    - Frank Hatherley (Stage Whispers)

    Mortido is a thrilling ride, charged with the audacity of the ambition of Ms Betzien’s imagination and research… Geoff Cobham, Lighting Designer, captures the murky colours of this false world of glamour, accompanied by Composition by The Sweats, with a magnificent Sound Design, by Nate Edmondson, that aurally careers around the alluring, confronting spaces and time of the play. … Mortido, then, maybe the best new Australian work we have seen this year.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Credit to Betzien and director Leticia Cáceres … for creating something truly terrifying, from the language through to the lighting. … Mortido is well written and executed, often laugh-out-loud funny, and utterly gripping – from its blood-soaked prologue to its Cola-splattered ending.”
    - Dee Jefferson (Time Out Sydney)

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DEPARTURES:
    “With lighting by Roderick van Gelder, costumes by Pamela McGraw and soundscapes by Nate Edmondson, Departures is another feather (candle) in the cap for a unique and inspiring company. Their work really should be more widely seen.”
    - Jo Litson (Scene And Heard)

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MINUSONESISTER:
    “Rogers makes imaginative use of the little stage, especially in the non-naturalistic sequences. … Cheel stood out, as did Nate Edmondson’s sound design.”
    - John Shand (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “Luke Rogers’ direction uses the small Griffin stage to great effect, bringing together fragmented scenes which jump in time, place and perspective, into a cohesive whole. … The set design, lighting and music choices all evoke the sense of isolation and desperation of characters marred by tragedy. A thoroughly compelling and thought provoking night at the theatre.”
    - Katharine Rogers (Arts Hub)

    “The production values, the Design, by Georgia Hopkins; the Lighting, by Sian James-Holland; and a dense … Composition and Sound Design, by Nate Edmondson, are of a very high quality – elegant and dramatic.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “…its sensuality resonates effectively, with beautifully crafted tension holding together a show that is full of fragility and volatility. Marvellously designed by the dynamic team of Georgia Hopkins (set and costumes), Sian James-Holland (lights) and Nate Edmondson (sound), we are transfixed and overcome by a sordid world populated by unimaginably dark thoughts and evil plans. …the production is a polished and sometimes spectacular one. There is a generous amount of talent on display, and every one of its fabulous facets welcomes our genuine and immediate admiration.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “Nate Edmondson’s score and sound design seems to rely upon a series of ominous drones and reverberating metallic clangs, but it also adds to the pervasive sense of unease and dread which hangs over these characters’ heads.”
    - Glenn Saunders (The Spell Of Waking Hours)

    “Sian James-Holland’s lighting and Nate Edmondson’s sound design and compositions are perfectly matched to production. Working seamlessly underneath. Another great production from Stories Like These and the Griffin Theatre. Worth adding this to you ‘Go See’ list.”
    - Lynden Jones (Theatre Now)

    “Luke Rogers has directed a fast-moving, textured and energetic production… The production elements are all first-class, from Georgia Hopkins’ sophisticated set and costumes to Sian James-Holland’s lighting design and Nate Edmondson’s sound design, which both punctuate the dramatic beats of the play.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review – Crikey)

    “The value of this play lies with this production, tautly directed and quite brilliantly executed by this young, aspiring ensemble.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Syke On Stage)

    “Sian James-Holland’s sterile and erratic lighting, accompanied by Nate Edmondson’s tense horror music, propelled the scene changes and maintained the fast pace. Despite the gory context of the play, the designers conveyed the dark mood subtly… The writing, design and performance came together brilliantly to produce a fast paced, engaging work that drew you in and spat you out.”
    - Jo Bradley (Scribbles Of Stage And Screen)

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THE TEMPEST:
    The Tempest opens with a cracking storm and shipwreck as Prospero’s enemies, handily passing by, are tossed on to the island. Alan Johns’s operatic score, designer Julie Lynch’s wildly billowing curtains and Damien Cooper’s expressive lighting immediately conjure a world of theatrical magic in which anything might happen.”
    - Deborah Jones (The Australian)

    “Music by Alan John and sound design by Nate Edmondson are outstanding features; helping to drive the production through atmospheric transformations and exquisite moments of ethereality.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “Immediately upon setting your feet into the theatre, it is clear that Bell wants his audiences to immerse themselves into the imaginative world of The Tempest. Nate Edmondson’s sound design grabs you on with its crashing waves, chirping birds and atmospheric sensations, very much supported by Alan John’s spectacular musical score. Not only do both become a drive for exposition and, at times, an allusion to the self-reflexivity of the play, but it also adds another layer of fascinating storytelling to its mix.”
    - Debbie Zhou (Theatre People)

    “The stage design truly sets the scene, it is minimalistic but it works here. There are tarp curtains that flutter around the raised circular stage, and the stage itself has a sharp edge somewhat reminiscent of the salt-crusted edges of sand dunes as they fall into the ocean. Sounds of the wind and ocean flutter constantly through the theatre intertwining with Alan John’s beautifully whimsical score, and the lighting is a mix of dream-like blues and sun-baked yellows. It’s all rather magical really. …it is the enchanting cast and stunning staging that has made this production by Bell Shakespeare my favourite by far. Be not afeard to see The Tempest, for it is full of noises, sounds, and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not!”
    - Kat Czornij (The AU Review)

    “…the casting is excellent, the set and costumes brilliant, the lighting, sound and music composition wonderful, and the movement exciting and telling…”
    - Frank McKone (Canberra Critics Circle)

    “Refreshingly for one of Shakespeare’s most imposed-upon works Bell has felt no need to ‘interpret’, but merely staged it so the sense of wonder has been a paramount concern across the creative team, including Julie Lynch’s designs, Damien Cooper’s lighting and Alan John’s music. Music is the blood of spirits, and John’s pretty songs and disembodied enchantments fully justify Caliban’s rapturous “When I wak’d/I cried to dream again” speech.”
    - John Shand (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “The opening storm scene, so difficult to stage, is perfectly executed and evoked here by the combination of Julie Lynch’s softly sensual and flowing set design, Damien Cooper’s lighting, Nate Edmondson’s sound skills and Scott Witt’s movement direction.”
    - Geraldine Worthington (Molong Online)

    “…enchanting, richly imaginative. evocative and effective as Julie Lynch’s set & costumes, Damien Cooper’s lighting, Alan John’s composition & Nate Edmondson’s sound design are…”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Syke On Stage)

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SEVENTEEN:
    “…Sarks’ production is restlessly active, emotionally vibrant and finessed.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “With a “Permission granted, @BelvoirSt” Taylor Swift became Australian theatre’s biggest news. When her pop mega-hit ’Shake It Off’ played during Seventeen’s opening night, the crowd cheered, clapped, and all but sang along. … They turn up their speakers and they dance – yes, to ‘Shake it Off’, but to plenty of other infectious pop songs too, like ‘Happy’ and ‘Raise Your Glass’…”
    - Cassie Tongue (Daily Review – Crikey)

    “Alan John’s compositions and Nate Edmondson’s sound design create a naturalistic world for the production, from the popular tunes played on the speakers, to the sounds of suburbia at night.”
    - Glenn Saunders (The Spell Of Waking Hours)

    “Taylor Swift has definitely enhanced her career by giving them permission to dance to ‘Shake It Off’, and meanwhile – get on down to Belvoir and revel in a show that combines charm and intensity and most of life’s deeper truths. Totes recommended.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “…picking an unobtainable track (i.e. a #1 single from the last 12 months) by Taylor Swift that you’ll have trouble securing the rights to, allowing you to barrack her via a social-media driven campaign that publicises your show, is a great way to get bums on seats (many thousands of bums, in fact, from what we hear). Hopefully the thousands of young ticket buyers will enjoy the experience and come back for another show, or even better – get turned on to theatre in general. …Matthew Whittet’s play has things to say to them that go deeper than the soundtrack of hits by Iggy Azalea, Farrell and Taylor Swift…”
    - Dee Jefferson (Time Out Sydney)

    “Watching John Gaden as Mike dance to Taylor Swift’s ‘Shake It Off’ was my favourite part. It allowed me to believe he was seventeen.”
    - Emily Shaddick (Australian Stage)

    “The stand-out scene, without a doubt, was when the cast grooved to ‘Shake It Off’, a Taylor Swift tune, showing that even at their advanced ages, they could still make all the right moves. Anne-Louise Sarks creative team brought Whittet’s world vividly to life.”
    - David Kary (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “What is the definition of happiness? We all have very different answers to this question, but seeing Seventeen at the Belvoir last night has provided me with a new answer: happiness is seeing John Gaden dance to Taylor Swift. … This is one of those ‘you’ll kick yourself if you miss it’ kind of plays, if only to see John Gaden et al ‘Shake it Off’. In fact that sequence received much applause from the audience, probably as much for overcoming the well-publicised last minute dramas over using the song, as for the performance itself.”
    - The Buzz From Sydney

    “The cast dancing to Taylor Swift’s ‘Shake it Off’ – which would have been cut if the pop megastar hadn’t given last-minute permission for the song’s use – is one of the most joy-filled moments on stage I have ever seen.”
    - Huw Griffiths (The Conversation)

    “One of the best moments in the play is the phenomenal dancing rendition of ‘Shake it Off’ by Taylor Swift. A truly priceless, hilarious 3 minutes of shakin’ it all off. … Never in my life have I enjoyed seniors dancing to a pop song, more than I did in Seventeen.”
    - Leanora Collett

    “It was so worth their twitter campaign for ‘Shake it Off’… Volume was perfect especially when the music was supposed to be under the action and from the portable.”
    - Sydney Live Theatre: Technical Notes

    “Best Sound/Music (2014/15): Nate Edmondson – Seventeen (Belvoir)”
    - The Buzz From Sydney

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SHELLSHOCK:
    “Lights (Matthew Marshall, with projections by Martin Kinnane), sound (Nate Edmondson) and a swirling score composed by Joseph Tawadros combine to excellent effect and cast a warm glow over this novel take on the Gallipoli legacy.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “Minimal prop changes, energetic music and innovative lighting and projections help to execute these transitions seamlessly while uninterruptedly holding the audience attention.”
    - Sereima Tarogi (Megaphone Oz)

    “The supporting contributions from Matthew Marshall and his Lighting Design; Nate Edmondson with his Sound Design; Sue Wallace with her puppet creation and performance (rod and mechanistic Herman); Martin Kinnane with the Projection Design and the Original Music by Joseph Tawadros (featuring the Oud) are of an exemplary order.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    Shellshock is a remarkable story about hope, family and the way we remember those that went before us. It was clearly a labour of love for all those involved, and will be a moving experience for those in the audience.”
    - Erica Enriquez (Weekend Notes)

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OF MICE AND MEN:
    “Nate Edmondson’s sound includes the expressive solitary guitar that then includes a realist perspective with environmental sound that becomes an intimate part of the emotional impact. All in all Iain Sinclair has produced a wonderful night at the theatre that complies with the always high standard Sport For Jove insists on with its productions.”
    - Lisa Thatcher

    “I make no apologies for reusing the word ‘natural’ to describe everything about this outstanding production. We saw a simple but effective design from Michael Hankin, …enhanced by the lighting design from Sian James Holland and sound design by Nate Edmondson. …the use of naturally occurring  sound in the background created atmosphere, and the audience’s commitment was palpable. I heard sighs and gasps at all the right times. The last scene led to nearly half a minute of stunned silence, then the rapturous applause exploded.”
    - Allan Chapple (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “Sport For Jove’s production is tight, elegant, mesmerising and atmospheric, richly evocative of the hardship of the era. …there is something immediately tangible and emotionally pulling about this setting which take us instantly to the time and a place, such as Steinbeck’s America, when to live off the land and have your own dream of a place of your own, was The American Dream. … Coupled with Sian James-Holland’s lighting, Nate Edmondson’s sound design of the working ranch, and live guitar music by Terry Serio, there is a kind of simple perfection to this production which is hard to beat.”
    - Glenn Saunders (The Spell Of Waking Hours)

    “This production, directed by Iain Sinclair, is a near flawless rendering of Steinbeck’s 78 year-old text. Beautifully realised by a brilliant design team (Michael Hankin is production designer, with Nate Edmondson on sound, and lights by Sian James-Holland ), the show feels rich with authenticity and provides our senses with a satisfying approximation of how Northern America must have been at the Great Depression. Sinclair’s consummate control of atmospherics delivers a transportative pleasure…”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “…quite simply, this is a marvellous production. …supported by a company of similarly fine actors and a fine creative team. Of Mice and Men is great theatre. The casting is sublime, the production is handsome. A pity the playwright wasn’t in the house to see it. Not to be missed.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “Sport for Jove, under the Direction of Iain Sinclair have mounted a more than handsome production of this great text. … The subtle Sound Design by Nate Edmondson adds, and carefully impinges on our consciousness to give depth of reality to the world of the play.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Chirruping crickets, creaking wood and scratching rats in the sound design (Nate Edmondson) transport the audience into the bunkhouse with the migrant workers. … The whole production seems bathed in a lovingly nostalgic golden haze, which is disconcertingly comforting. Throw in the live guitar and harmonica and you almost want to pull up a rocking chair and join George and Lennie.”
    - Jen Cannock (Time Out Sydney)

    “Sport for Jove have, once again, delivered an outstanding piece of theatre. Their production of John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men is practically flawless. From beginning to end, it was enthralling, moving, poignant and heart breaking. … Nate Edmondson’s soundscapes that ran throughout were so subtle they might have been missed, which is exactly the way they should be. They so easily summoned up images of what lay beyond our immediate view, whether it was the men winding down after a long day’s work, or birds chirping in the summer heat. Unassuming and simple, yet hugely effective. … It’s a beautiful piece of theatre, and should not be missed.”
    - Alana Kaye (Theatre Now)

    “Chippendale is a long way from rural California, yet, in its inimitable, scrupulous, intensive way, Sport for Jove manages to create a derelict, dustbowl on stage that takes you there. … Director Iain ‘Nobby’ Sinclair seems to have a profound grasp of the work’s profundity and has exemplified this in the way he’s cast his gaze over the entire production and managed to communicate the world of the play (to resort to a terrible cliche) to cast & creatives, who, overwhelmingly, exemplify the depth of his understanding, insight and appreciation. The result is a almost reverent homage. … Michael Hankin’s production design, Nate Edmondson’s wonderfully naturalistic, spatially convincing soundscape and Sian James-Holland’s lighting get the production off on the right foot and keep it there.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Syke On Stage)

    “Sinclair’s coherent staging, as well as the contribution of the design team, conveys well the claustrophobic intimacy of this world. This is one of SPJ’s best-ever productions. Don’t miss it.”
    - Veronica Hannon (Gay News Network)

    “The production is an effortless refashioning of Steinbeck’s original work that draws in every audience member and distils the raw emotion that acts as a reflex response to the sometimes shocking, yet mundane, circumstances that arise. It is breathtaking in its simplicity. … Sport for Jove’s play Of Mice and Men is immensely compelling and showcases incredible skill in all aspects of the production.”
    - Emily Richardson (Absolute Theatre)

    “There’s occasional live music, with guitar and mouth organ to sharpen the mood. … Opening night’s audience responded to the piece with its twists and mood and power with indrawn breaths and utterly solid applause for this version of Steinbeck’s small modern tragedy. It is just a pity that the season is so short.”
    - Alanna Maclean (Canberra Times)

    “Iain Sinclair’s directing, in Michel Hankin’s ostensibly simple yet very clever set design, lit in shadows by Sian James-Holland and with Georgia Hopkins’ costumes and hair designs, recreates an image of the loneliness of Steinbeck’s Great Depression, emphasised by the solo slide guitar and single-notes wistful folk harmonica. … I can only say it’s a great feeling to be surpassed by the quality of thought and art in this production and to have my ancient limited understanding of Of Mice and Men broadened and deepened.”
    - Frank McKone (Canberra Critics Circle)

    “Iain Sinclair has produced a strong, uncompromising production that presents a very real impression of the era. … Lighting designed by Sian James-Holland adds greatly to the atmosphere as does the sound design of Nate Edmondson. … If you’ve never read or seen it, don’t miss this opportunity to undergo a profound experience.”
    - Len Power (Canberra Critics Circle)

    “Without waiting for the formality of curtain rises and the like, a lone acoustic guitarist serenades the audience members as they take their seats, heralding a pattern where the sounds of the west are interwoven into the scene changes throughout the show. … Of Mice & Men is a tribute to the power of storytelling. With understated sight and sound effects and seamlessly delivered performances, the unassuming production avoids any hint of sentimentality that might detract from the clarity of Steinbeck’s script. Instead it is for the audience to fill in the gaps with their own emotions, to turn the show into something beyond a mere display and to make it into an experience. Sport for Jove facilitate this objective by presenting a narrative that seeks not to impose a predisposed interpretation and instead remains quintessential in its craft. The result is an outstanding adaptation that is indicative of a dedicated team working together to bring this heartbreaking tale to life.”
    - Revelly Robinson (Arts Hub)

    “…the production worked very well, all characters well defined despite their number, a blues guitarist setting the mood for each act, and a single versatile set becoming the outdoors, a bunkhouse, a single bedroom, and a barn by the simple magic of furniture removalism. Articulation was very good, with the sound balance perfect…”
    - John P. Harvey (Stage Whispers)

    “Sport for Jove’s ‘Of Mice and Men’ – seriously one of the best productions I’ve seen this year and director Iain Sinclair found a beautiful juxtaposition of rustic dreams and brutal reality with an outstanding cast and design.”
    - Jane Simmons (Shit On Your Play)

    “The sound effects are very well thought through in this production and are a highlight in creating the feel and atmosphere. There are distant dogs and sunset insects all the way through the initial scene and a flock of birds will occasionally take flight in perfect rhythm with the text and action. When the action moves to the ranch there is a range of effects used. The set build into the bunkhouse is covered with owls, indeterminate nature and the distant dogs barking. The dray arrival complete with horses neighing, bridles clinking and men being rowdy really set the scenes for the use of audio as background setting. The real men then start to call from backstage and the move into action is completed smoothly. Their wash up is also nicely done with effects of water splashing and bowls being banged with the men chatting. There is some evening insect noise under but it is different to the first scenes at a much lower level. The bird noises heard in the first scene are slowly brought up to conscious level as the death is announced and fills the stage when it is empty. The men playing horseshoes is very well recorded and played through the USR speaker, places the non visible action perfectly. You can hear the conversations and comments and the metallic clinking. Especially impressive is the “somebody made a ringer” line. It was timed perfectly. Also impressive was the horses in various speakers around Crooks’ room. You could hear the kick on the stalls, stamping, the metal clink of their movement, neighs and occasional metallic elements in separate places. Individual noises punctuate the action. As the animals are disturbed when Crooks arrives, there is a louder and more targeted neighs. Truly wonderful.”
    - Sydney Live Theatre: Technical Notes

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MISTERMAN:
    “… this production, directed by Kate Gaul, is perfect in almost every regard. … all the elements combine in the tiny theatre to create something unexpectedly moving and overwhelming. Gaul has pulled together every element with a sensitive hand, including Nate Edmondson’s creeping sound design, which pours out of speakers all throughout the theatres… This is a spectacular production with a spectacular performance which shouldn’t be missed.”
    - Ben Neutze (Daily Review – Crikey)

    “A terrific script and a masterful characterisation are aided and abetted to high degree by Hartley T A Kemp’s lighting design that is not afraid of the dark, and Nate Edmondson’s sound design, pivotal to the focus on the auditory that pervades the play. Thomas is quite literally hounded and haunted by sounds and voices, and due to Edmondson’s work, the audience is too. The machines are like ghosts, unholy ones at that, at times turning on automatically, repeating the recorded past, taunting Thomas’ present. Misterman is chilling, thrilling, compelling theatre. It would be a sin to miss it.”
    - Richard Cotter (Australian Stage / Sydney Arts Guide)

    “The holistic incorporation of design faculties demonstrates a sophistication that reflects a deep understanding of the nature and capacities of theatre. Set by Gaul, lights by Harley T A Kemp, music and sound by Nate Edmondson contribute much more than atmosphere. The way we understand the protagonist’s environment and his psychology happens through the accomplishments of this formidable design crew, and their exhaustive exploration of space and fantasy.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “… surrounded as he is by archaic reel-to-reel tape recorders and cassette players that intermittently crackle into life with snatches of voices and disparate sounds (wondrous sound design by Nate Edmondson) – there’s a touch of Krapp’s Last Tape  too. … Simplicity and complexity combine in a virtually flawless production from Kate Gaul and Thomas Campbell. Not to be missed.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “Moments – like when Campbell cooks and eats a scrambled egg, or when he goes to the cemetery to visit his late father – are moving and poignant, simple charms of stagecraft, but are also portents of what is to come, and Gaul does not shy away from giving us the full horror of the final moments in a terrifying soundscape. Nate Edmondson’s sound design and score are naturalistic, and is impeccably timed with Magill’s finely calibrated performance, and vice-versa. … it seems perfectly crafted… I’d even go so far as to say it’s one of the highlights of the year so far. Definitely recommended.”
    - Glenn Saunders (The Spell Of Waking Hours)

    “… in Misterman particularly, the sound design and lighting design form their own characters from off the stage, giving the impression that Thomas, with his endless torturous demons, is never alone. Nate Edmondson’s recordings from old reel to reel tapes and his imposing sounds from outside the world/mind of Thomas bring others into Thomas’ strange world and complete the sense of the dire and desperate place Thomas is in as he struggles with his memories. One of the challenges for any performer (director and rest of the crew) of Misterman is to be in perfect rapport with the sound designer, where timing and connection are directly translated to the audience. If there was a hitch on opening night, I didn’t see it, as the splendid ode to Beckett rings out perfectly timed in the gorgeous dungeon of the Old Fitz Theatre. …the entire seventy minutes of Misterman flies by, leaving one partly horrified and completely amazed. This is a production you won’t want to miss. Highly recommended.”
    - Lisa Thatcher

    “The creditable technical side of the production deserves mention. Flawless playback allowed Thomas to carry on the dialogue with other members of the town exactly as he saw fit. … This train wreck is nuanced and beautiful.”
    - Sean Maroney (The Music)

    “Excellent sound (Nate Edmondson) and lighting (Hartley T A Kemp) build an ominous atmosphere. … Misterman is a compelling look into an unhinged mind and an exciting piece of theatre.”
    - The Sunday Telegraph

    “While it’s strictly a one-man show, Campbell is not alone on stage, accompanied by the meticulously plotted sound (by Nate Edmondson) and lighting design (Hartley T A Kemp) that beautifully amplifies his performance.”
    – Jen Cannock (Time Out Sydney)

    “… bright moments that were assisted by a very comprehensive and supporting sound design by Nate Edmondson…”
    - Stevie Zipper (Theatre Unzipped)

    “The lighting and sound design seamlessly enhance the creepily atmospheric space. Nate Edmondson supplies arguably the best sound design the Old Fitz space has seen… A delicious production of a disturbing but electrifying play.”
    - Maryann Wright (Stage Whispers)

    “Gaul has pulled together a tight team of creatives to create Thomas’ world, including Hartley T. A. Kemp’s lighting design; Nate Edmondson’s composition and sound (which is pivotal)… Misterman is provocative, buzzes with nuclear energy…”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Syke On Stage)

    “Nate Edmondson’s soundscape brilliantly scores the intense drama of the evening. This is a challenging and exquisitely realised piece of theatre, not to be missed.”
    - Michael McLaughlin (The Mercury)

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DECAY:
    “Nate Edmondson’s sound design is cleverly imagined, and beautifully realised. Without many spoken lines to occupy our minds with, Edmondson’s contribution takes on greater importance than usual. More than any other element of the show, it is the sound that provides us with the information required to help make sense of the intriguing chaos that unfolds.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “Chant is on quite a roll at the moment and this production is no exception, she has created a fantastic world of such gruesome intensity it is hard to watch at times, but impossible to look away. … When you enter the theatre the air is hazy and you can hear emergency air horns, signalling the unseen catastrophe. The stage has been transformed brilliantly into a Japanese apartment, but without the claustrophobia.”
    - The Buzz From Sydney

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WHEN THE RAIN STOPS FALLING:
    “Upon entering the auditorium, the rumbling sounds of a tropical monsoon emanates from the stage to greet us. Without characters and narratives, we sit listening, surrendering to the voluntary effects that our physical selves cannot help but react with. Emotions surface, seemingly for no rhyme or reason. The art that we experience changes us, without letting us know how and why. A delicious melancholy, like a calm sadness, washes over. When the story begins, we are already hypnotised. … Direction of the piece is provided by Rachel Chant, who impresses with an extraordinarily deft hand at emotive expression. Our senses are captivated for the entire two-hour duration, by her sensitive and adventurous exploration of sound and sight … to create a quality of pathos that is intensely lyrical but never melodramatic. …It is a rare occurrence to have the sound design of a non-musical theatre production steal the thunder, but Nate Edmondson and Alistair Wallace’s partnership is a clear triumph. Their work is original, surprising and experimental, but always effective and often powerful. It is omnipresent, but never distracting. There is an accuracy to the way the sound of When The Rain Stops Falling parallels, or perhaps determines, the stage action that makes the show inexorably involving and at many points, sublimely devastating.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “The original Brink Theatre production was meticulously prepared by some great practising artists and the long ‘gestation’ of that work is, partly, what gave the original production its depth of power and wonder. More modestly, the New Theatre production, under the respectful guidance of a young Director, Rachel Chant … supported by the growing powers of the recently very busy Lighting designer, Benjamin Brockman, and the, similarly, prolific Sound Designer Composer, Nate Edmondson, assisted by Alistair Wallace, triumphs.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Nate Edmondson  creates beautiful sound design cleverly using the sounds of rain here to inspire both the peace of natures cleanse and the ominous fear of drowning in emotional intensity.”
    - Lisa Thatcher

    “Nate Edmondson’s musical composition is haunting and beautiful and perfect for the piece. Similarly the sound design (Nate Edmondson and Alistair Wallace), which seamlessly transports the audience into the world of the characters.”
    - Kitty Hopwood (Theatre Now)

    “The rain/thunder SFX which are loud and violent on audience entry are well-sourced and provide an excellent ambient state for the audience. … The music is lovely and the levels were good to my ears. … The music is electronic and keyboard but it manages not to be period specific. The single keyboard note or chords are skilfully inserted into the show. The single piano notes are especially well-used during the car accident monologue; very evocative and slightly disorienting. … The piercing electronica for the entry of the food and coat hanging works well as counterpoint to the simple, slow, silent movement. … The weather SFX under the Mary Shelley piece is just low enough to re-enforce the exterior events and interior turmoil.”
    - Sydney Live Theatre: Technical Notes

    “Their work is well supported by the excellent music created by Nate Edmondson, a composer who seems to be everywhere at the moment. His use of low electronica morphing into single light piano under the initial monologue is a masterful and his use of bass to build a bridge to the first scream is wonderful. His audio design is created with Alistair Wallace and the loud, topical downpour which greets the audience on arrival expertly fades to a subtle and ‘just there’ underscore.”
    - Judith Greenaway (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “Ultimately the piece is clearly intentioned and well polished – a credit to director Rachel Chant. It is also worth mentioning the high production quality provided by Tom Bannerman (set design), Benjamin Brockman (lighting design) and Nate Edmondson (sound design).”
    - Dinner And A Show

    “On occasion at New Theatre sound levels have been intrusive, but for this production it was just right — and the final music was perfect, haunting me out into the foyer where I couldn’t speak for several minutes.”
    - Sanda Bowden (Oz Baby Boomers)

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FREAK WINDS:
    “And the technical elements in this production are all brilliant — Nate Edmondson’s sound design gives the audience plenty of jolts in their seats…”
    - Ben Neutze (Crikey)

    “The play started out beautifully, lighting designer Alexander Berlage and sound designer Nate Edmondson setting the tone of the piece that was immersive and interesting. …the set production, lighting design and sound out-shone the show…”
    - Stevie Zipper (Theatre Unzipped)

    Freak Winds is beautifully designed by a creative team that has addressed every aspect of sight and sound with good taste and sensitivity. Nate Edmondson’s sound design rumbles beneath our feet to taunt us into a space of horror, and along with Alexander Berlage’s lights, the small venue is dissected into a hundred different spots, adventurously explored in all their possibilities.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “The lighting by Alexander Berlage … supports the horror layerings, as does the Sound Design, by Nate Edmondson.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Sound design and lighting, I hasten to add, contribute in almost equal measure to script, set and performances.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Syke On Stage)

    “Clever use of sound was employed to set the scene, as well as onstage lighting through the windows, indicating the storm outside.”
    - Emily Richardson (Absolute Theatre)

    “Nate Edmondson was responsible for auditory effects and he masterfully created sound effects that were both real and frightening. The threatening sounds of knives being sharpened triggered fear and an uneasy expectation of dangerous and cruel outcomes. The precise use of sound effects quickened the pulse of the audience adding to the agitated and foreboding nature of the developing disturbing thriller.”
    - Rose Niland (The Culture Concept)

    “The wind SFX on entry was loud and given the title of the show entirely appropriate. There was an arctic feel to the effect giving a chilly ambiance. … The radio was used for announcements and the audio only came from the speaker on P. The announcements were very well recorded to give an old fashioned static-y feel to the radio appliance. … There were several SFX from the dressing room, ostensibly the kitchen and there was speaker in there. Vomiting, toilet flush, knife on grindstone. There were also some practical effects from that area. Jug boil, crash box. … Good use of an angelic choir was made leading into the final scene change. A well sourced effect for the Taser. The final audio well matched the macabre final state with loud cries, bells and high pitched wails leading to birdsong.”
    - Sydney Live Theatre: Technical Notes

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CARESS/ACHE:
    “The script … lays out a bunch of buttons to press for particular emotional reactions and Skuse, to his credit, presses them all, using Nate Edmondson’s eerie compositions, sung live by the cast…”
    - Ben Neutze (Crikey)

    “Skuse draws similarly rarified performances from his actors; although often earthbound in conflict and pain, they float in the whiteness and light, upheld by an almost continuous and occasionally luscious soundscape (Nate Edmondson, composer/designer).”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “Nate Edmondson has matched director Anthony Skuse’s exceedingly cinematic approach (including projected text, citing scientific, or pseudo-scientific facts about human neurological response) with a score worthy of a feature film…”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Syke On Stage)

    “…Edmondson’s score sounds like a cross between Philip Glass and Alexandre Desplat, and provides the emotional tug we don’t quite get through Miller’s writing.”
    - Glenn Saunders (The Spell Of Waking Hours)

    “The actors performed with aplomb, and the haunting choral music and sporadic set projections about the science behind human contact unified their scenes in a manner evoking Expressionism.”
    - Bite Size Reviews

    “And then unfolds before us a multi-faceted poem; an ode to touch. But instead of just using words, it uses actors, projection screens, choral work, recorded music and lighting. …I am filled with admiration for the technical team. Director Anthony Skuse was as much logistics manager as creative artist. He worked with Sophie Fletcher (designer), Matthew Marshall (lighting designer), Nate Edmondson (composer/sound designer) and the actors themselves to almost flawlessly pull off complex choreography of so many theatrical elements.”
    - Toni Carroll (Molong Online)

    “The design was beautifully crafted… The emotion keeps you transfixed through a heavily composed sound designer, never leaving the intimacy and enacting the surrounds perfectly regardless of the setting. This is topped off perfectly by live singing…”
    - Love Always, Alana

    “Anthony Skuse’s direction is clear and very fluid. … His creative team support him well; a great score by Nate Edmondson, Matthew Marshall’s lighting design is sharp, and Sophie Fletcher’s compact set work well.”
    - David Kary (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “The composing was really good. Whoosh noises created electronically and keyboard notes and chords as support or counterpoint to the text or emotion. … There was a weird heartbeat-type note included with a whoosh sound combined with an almost vomitus note for the autopsy scene. Really evocative. As was the single sharp notes over the sex ballet and the metallic hits under the forearm sequence. … The cast hum a Capella for the opening and this is repeated once and then reinforced with a recoding towards the finale. … The SFX of the air conditioner really under the execution lead up was another neatly effective subtlety.”
    - Sydney Live Theatre: Technical Notes

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THE VERY HUNGRY
CATERPILLAR SHOW
(AUSTRALIA):
    “Kudos should also go to the musical and sound design team. The original soundtrack hits just the right note, a fitting aural accompaniment to the beautiful visuals unfolding on stage.”
    - Chris Hook (The Daily Telegraph)

    The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show is a gorgeous little stage production for children aged one to seven that captivates with its clear storytelling, its fresh, bright design and its simple but inventive staging. Nate Edmondson’s music and Nicholas Rayment’s lighting are also pitch-perfect.”
    - Jo Litson (Scene And Heard)

    “Beautiful, rhythmic and faithful to the author’s works, The Very Hungry Caterpillar is a triumph for first time theatregoers. … As characters emerged on stage the space is filled with vivid colours and buoyant sounds that captures the attention of even the youngest in the room. … Filled with ‘wow’ moments and stunning effects throughout, The Very Hungry Caterpillar is mesmerising.”
    - Emma Joyce (Time Out Sydney)

    “Add the beautifully intuitive lighting and eclectic musical score and these scenes had the audience of all ages mesmerised. … For the tiny folk, my 9 month old included, the lighting, illusions, movement and music had them enthralled and I didn’t hear one cranky kid during the 50 minute performance! A testament to the skill, thought and care of the production.”
    - Kid Town Melbourne

    “The performance features rich, original music and warm, sumptuous lighting, and is well-paced but with a calm decorum which soothes the nerves of parents and children alike. … The children who surrounded and accompanied me sat largely transfixed, open-mouthed throughout the show, spellbound by the steady spectacle of colour and light and sound which poured forth over its 50 minute running time.”
    - Amelia Swan (Arts Hub)

    “This show had everything kids could ever want: vibrant colours, movement, music and magic. From a parent’s perspective, the show had all this and more including important messages of inspiration in the use of colour, responsibility and duty, belonging, and hope. I couldn’t have imagined a better day spent with my family…”
    - Lauren Jackman (Canberra Mummy)

    “The creative team behind The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show demonstrates that magic is not merely the province of the sleight of hand or the cunning illusion. … The magic in the story and the marvellously gentle puppetry, narration and musical backing, all illuminated by the changing scenes, are sufficient to bring Carle’s world to life and keep it vivid in the minds of an audience who are old enough to remember.”
    - Peter Wilkins (Canberra Critics Circle)

    “For her very first theatre experience I have to say it was wonderful and I cannot recommend it more highly. It was a perfect mix of colour, movement, music and narration. The children were given full permission at the beginning to be involved with clapping and calling out, which they all enjoyed doing throughout the performance. This classic book was brought to life beautifully for both children and parents to enjoy. The staging, props and amazing puppets were full of surprises and quite magical at times.”
    - Kid Size Living

    “The music accompanying each story varies but is also upbeat. The lighting and set, which is mostly white, is bright and the simplicity allows for the puppets to pop. … A timeless classic beautifully adapted for first-time theatre-goers.”
    - Joanna Love (Child Magazine)

    “The show was timeless theatre that entertained and delighted all generations. The stories about friendship and finding your place in the world were told with a rare and simple beauty. … In the show the startling clarity of design and the integrity of interpreting Carle’s exquisite illustrations were profoundly wondrous. Astutely and sensitively directed by Naomi Edwards where her flair for the artistic unity of the production was accomplished with perfection. … The food puppets travelled around the stage in skilfully choreographed dance sequences. The actor’s nimble manoeuvring of the puppets gave focus and rhythm to the performance. … Every aspect of this production was impeccable and the heart-warming interpretation of the books was authentic and honoured the originals.”
    - Rose Niland (The Culture Concept)

    The Very Hungry Caterpillar was as amazing production where everything was created with kids in mind. The stories were beautifully presented through the stage, the music and the puppets. It exceeded my expectations… Overall, I highly recommend anyone with children aged 2 to 5 years to go and see this wonderful production. It is my favourite kids show so far and I would take my youngest to see it when it comes back again.”
    - Christine Knight (Adventure, Baby!)

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RIVER:
    “The very subtle work by composer and sound designer Nate Edmondson and lighting designer Benjamin Brockman might be easy to overlook, but their efficacy at controlling ambience is quite perfect. Within the understated aesthetic requirements of the production, they have found creative space to demonstrate innovation and sensitive flair.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “Terrific Sound Design, by Nate Edmondson.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Nate Edmondson’s soundtrack blends with the ambient noise drifting up from Elizabeth Street to create a sense of connection to the real city this fictional character inhabits.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

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DAYLIGHT SAVING:
    “Nate Edmondson’s soundscape includes extracts from some of the best rock tracks of the time.”
    - David Kary (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “The 1980s is ripe for laughter – we remember the décor and the shoulder pads and the music, assembled by Nate Edmondson – but it’s the timeless themes of the play that keep us interested, as well as Enright’s ear for dialogue, character and dramatic tension.”
    - Hannah Story (The Music)

    “A real telephone ring. Just perfect. The VCR audio came from the coffee table and represented the TV extremely well. The boom box was used as a practical… they loaded a cassette in and pushed the button and the sound came out. Great stuff. The preshow, interval and scene change music was well chosen and entertainingly nostalgic! And the volume was great. A little louder for the rock of course. I stayed in the house at interval to enjoy it.”
    - Sydney Live Theatre: Technical Notes

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MACBETH:
    “Nate Edmondson’s score and sound design, while ever-present and almost through-composed, is a beautiful and often haunting counterpoint to the sometimes nihilistic words and actions on-stage. From the opening judders and whisperings which signal the Weird Sisters’ entrance, to the anthemic entrance of Malcolm and the halcyon final coronation scene, this is a Macbeth composed of many beautiful images and moments, a clever poetry in its execution…”
    - The Spell Of Waking Hours

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THE WITCHES:
    “I found The Witches funny and dramatic. The sound effects went really well with each different part of the story, using things like lightning and background music.”
    - Felicity Dayhew (Stage Noise)

    “Christopher Page’s lighting is theatrical, almost storybook-like, and is perfectly complemented by Nate Edmondson’s score, near through-composed, every cue and moment with its own gleefully designated sound, from Grand Guignol-esque fanfares to quiet strings, to a crazy carnivalesque tune to ticking clocks, and every moment is timed within an inch of its life, coordinated and unified.”
    - The Spell Of Waking Hours

    “… the sound design by Nate Edmondson is astutely atmospheric. … Storytelling at its very best – I highly recommend this one for the kids… Well worth seeing.”
    - Kimberley Shaw (Stage Whispers)

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SCENES FROM AN
EXECUTION:
    “Set (Andrea Espinoza), costume (Christie Bennett) and sound (Nate Edmondson) cohere well and contribute much to this robust and stimulating show.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “…the Sound Design by Nate Edmondson serves the production well.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Sound (Nate Edmondson) and lighting (Ben Brockman) are appropriate in mood-setting… This is a play with few faults.”
    - Suzanne Rath (Arts Hub)

    “…sound designer Nate Edmondson successfully transports us to the 16th century with his compositions…”
    - Jessica Keath (Concrete Playground)

    “A backdrop of empty picture frames quickly conjures up the grand galleries of the Doge’s palace and Galactica’s studio. Lights (Ben Brockman) and sound (Nate Edmondson) are cleverly used. This is a fine play.”
    - Elissa Blake (The Sun Herald)

    “There is a story, and stakes are raised, and characters are tested – to be sure, but any ensemble presenting will be met with the severest of inclined text, each level providing steep challenges; layering complexity of language, subtlety in characterisation, clarity of metaphor, boldness of costume and design, fluidity of composition, philosophical reach, truth-seeking, wickedness in humour… The kinds of things one expects from a powerful night at the theatre. … On a technical level – these are the multiple competing texts found in theatre which make the form so compelling for artist and audience alike. A three-dimensional canvas of word, sound, voice, music, gesture and image to shift beneath such tectonic elements as plot, setting or character. The story is a cracker, but the challenge of the artistry is found in the underlying tensions in form, the convex mirrors enable its imagery to take on a kind of megalithic cultural significance. Objects may seem larger than they appear. A great play such as this is not merely a set of events, or a set of characters, or even a set of ideas; it is a blueprint for a visual and aural and verbal assault on the mind and soul of its audience. …go and see this play. It’s a brutal, sexy, and confrontational mud-wrestle between art and language, with some of the most visceral and funny dialogue on offer.”
    - Victor Sanchez (5th Wall)

    Scenes From An Execution is an incredibly rich, textured piece of theatre. There is so much here to chew on, intellectually and emotionally. … This is a really good production of a very difficult script. … I found Scenes From An Execution utterly fascinating. Make time to go and see it.”
    - Jodi (Theatre From The Back Seat)

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MUSIC:
    “Adam’s penchant for dark 1980s pop (Joy Division, The Smiths, Siouxsie and the Banshees) punctuates the drama powerfully and drives the sense that his life is spinning out of his control.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “The Sound Design by Nate Edmondson is what Ms Bodie believes her brother, would “bloody love”…”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “…with a gently evocative score by Nate Edmondson, … – it evolves as it unfolds, from awkwardness through tenderness to despair as the house of cards comes crashing down around them all. …it hits its stride (or finds its rhythm, to continue the musical motif) and features a soundtrack of post-punk and dark pop songs that perfectly capture the mood of Adam’s life speeding out from under his fingers.”
    - The Spell Of Waking Hours

    “The creatives complement and comment on the action well, particularly Nate Edmondson’s soundscape … which often replicates Adam’s oscillating moods.”
    - David Kary (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “Within the drama appear lovely moments of humour and — naturally, given the title — music. Fantastic music, in fact. As we all could pick a soundtrack to our lives, so Adam finds his truth within the cassettes and CDs strewn around his cluttered flat.”
    - Sandra Bowden (Oz Baby Boomers)

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THE WINTER’S TALE:
    “There is much to like here, from Stephen Curtis’ set, Matthew Marshall’s vibrant lighting, Alan John’s Cat Stevens-esque songs and Nate Edmondson’s fairytale sound design.”
    - The Spell Of Waking Hours

    “Bell has incorporated a number of bold conceits, bolstered by Stephen Curtis’ design, Nate Edmondson’s cavernous sound and Alan John’s unconventional composition.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Crikey)

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JUMP FOR JORDAN:
    “As well as the exemplary cast, the creatives are also on fire. The stage morphs from a parched desert-carpet via an open window to a sand dune that symbolises the dream-like past of Jordan and the misery of “new” Australian suburbia – and also down-at-heel city rental living. Nate Edmondson (composer and sound designer) subtly underlines that living under the flight path is noisy, while living as a migrant brings an inner soundscape that can conjure the past and present simultaneously.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “Nicholas Rayment’s lighting design was crisp and supportive of the work, wonderfully assisting Nate Edmondson’s Composition that travelled beautifully throughout the production.”
    - Stevie Zipper (Theatre Unzipped)

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KING LEAR (SYDNEY
SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL):
    “Incidentally, the storm itself is well-handled and David Jeffrey’s lighting, Nate Edmondson’s sound and the windswept deportment of the cast create a suitable illusion.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Crikey)

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ALL MY SONS:
    “There is a score by Nate Edmondson that is almost cinematic in the way it supports and enhances the emotion.”
    - John McCallum (The Australian)

    “It is noteworthy also that sound design by Nate Edmondson is subtle and indispensably effective.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “Nate Edmondson’s subtle music score works well, as does Nicholas Rayment’s lighting design.”
    - David Kary (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “Luke Ede’s production design, Nate Edmondson’s sound and Nicholas Rayment’s lighting all combine to take us back in time to 1950s middle America, when life was supposed to be simple, but was far far from it.”
    - Whitney Fitzsimmons (Stage Whispers)

    “Musical punctuation and the distant drone of aircraft, above the chirping birds out on the back porch, are the only concessions to abstraction. Yet the play yells out at us today.”
    - Martin Portus (Arts Hub)

    “Nate Edmondson’s composition and sound design is minimal (less is more) and disciplined…”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Crikey)

    “Sound (by Nate Edmondson) was subtle, naturalistic, and foreboding – the right mix for a play that builds its intensity and shapes it over long notes; suggestions of aural memories are delicate enough to be poignant.”
    - Cassie Tongue (Aussie Theatre)

    Winner: The Brian Dyer Sound Trophy for Best Sound Design, 2014/15 (The Phoebe Rees Competition – The Somerset Fellowship of Drama, UK)

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ROMEO AND JULIET:
    “…impressive cinematic sequences in which the entire set revolves to dramatic music (lending a propulsive quality that reflects the momentum of the work as written)…”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Crikey)

    “There are some really gorgeous theatrical moments: design and direction perfectly in step.”
    - Vicky Frost (The Guardian)

    “Sound designer Alan John and associate, Nate Edmondson, created an eclectic soundscape that underpins the emotional thread of the production and is one of the most sympathetic and creative I have heard recently.”
    - Rebecca Whitton (Australian Stage)

    “It’s a smartly trimmed-down production; the staging, with music and lighting, delivers exposition as well as the Prince and the full prologue – as well as the opening scenes – so they are jettisoned. Instead we are treated to a music video montage, a Skins-esque study of the bored, the rich, the endless nights of excess, to open the piece.”
    - Cassie Tongue (Aussie Theatre)

    “Underlying – and underlining – the dreadful arc of the play is a terrific, almost filmic soundtrack of found and composed music.”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “Alan John’s, together with Nate Edmondson’s, soundscape works in well with the narrative, mixing cutting edge music bytes with orchestral tones.”
    - David Kary (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “Set to a dance-music score and rather electronic sound design (Alan John and Nate Edmondson), the bass beat from the party scene suddenly becomes Romeo and Juliet’s fast-beating hearts in a startlingly fresh moment of sonic poetry. There are moments in the score which seem to be imbued with something akin to Sigur Rós’s lyricism, and it perfectly captures the giddiness, the head-over-heels nature of Romeo and Juliet’s attraction to each other, at the same time as hinting at something darker to come.”
    - The Spell Of Waking Hours

    “…the use of modern music mixed with Handel’s Coronation really does a lot to set the tone for the whole production.”
    - Matthew D’Silva (Same Same)

    “Special thanks should be reserved for David Fleischer for his inspired set design, and Alan John & Nate Edmondson’s dynamic soundtrack.”
    - Dinner And A Show

    “There’s chandelier-swinging (literally), a glitzy party with a pulsating dance soundtrack (Robyn’s ‘None Of Dem’) and creepy rabbit masks, and a massive set that twists and turns on a revolve.”
    - Benjamin Neutze (Time Out Sydney)

    “The low comedy of near recognition and meetings is counterpointed with a triumphant classic music score that finishes in a timely, elevated fashion with the fateful wedding kiss – to give conclusion of the first half, a golden comic high.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “With people swinging from chandeliers, drunken fights, mysterious bunny masks and the perfect party soundtrack, you won’t want this sequence to end!”
    - Simon Edds (Daily Sydney)

    ‘Romeo and Juliet’ opens to a montage of youthful hedonism butting its head up against reckless conflict on a grand and elaborate set and revolving stage, accompanied by an exciting contemporary soundtrack. Wow. Seriously. Wow. … We see the transience of each moment of the play for its characters and it is underscored with a soundtrack of bass lines and percussion.”
    - Jane Simmons (Shit On Your Play)

    “Aided by contemporary rock music the fast paced action is engaging.”
    - David Spicer (Stage Whispers)

    “The sound design is superb. Mixing modern with classical in the first Act, and an increasingly tense, more subtle soundscape in the second enriches the flow of action and the build-up to the powerful final moments. Even knowing full well how it ends, the manner in which this plays out is a shock.”
    - Sandra Bowden (Oz Baby Boomers)

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SALOMÉ:
    “The 80′s soundtrack underscores the production, that will have you hearing “Dance for me, Salomé!” long after the curtain has closed.”
    - Rohan Shearn (Australian Arts Review)

    “Booming down like the voice of God, her microphone – powered speeches are highlighted with faultless sound design by Nate Edmondson. Key narrative points are deliberately and hilariously cut with characters breaking into lip – synchronised song.”
    - Nick Pilgrim (Theatre People)

    “Little Ones Theatre’s slick and flippant production of Oscar Wilde’s Salome is lively, loud, lighthearted and wickedly profane. It’s an ‘in-your-face’ cabaret performance with loads of well-dressed and undressed ‘eye-candy’ and more than just a hint of Jean Genet.”
    - Suzanne Sandow (Stage Whispers)

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FIREFACE:
    “…sensitive and intricate Sound Design by Nate Edmondson…”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Of special note is Nate Edmondson’s portentous, reverberant sound design. The earth moved for me, time and again.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Crikey)

    “It is ominously effective and along with Sian James Holland’s moody lighting and Nate Edmondson’s throbbing sound design, underlines the precarious predicament facing the characters.”
    - Veronica Hannon (Gay News Network)

    Fireface is constructed of a series of 94 short vignettes, beautifully separated by foreboding musical pieces designed by Nate Edmondson.”
    - Suzanne Rath (Arts Hub)

    “Lighting and sound are pushed to their limit… in what is essentially a narrative based play. They add to the drama, and assist with the innumerable scene changes in Von Mayenburg’s script…”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

    “…he is ably aided by Lucilla Smith’s functional but fluid set design, Nate Edmondson’s jolting and throbbing sound design and Sian-James Holland’s shutter-speed lighting.”
    - Geraldine Worthington (Oz Baby Boomers)

    “Luke Rogers punctuates the myriad scenes with sharp blackouts and a surge of sound not unlike the explosive crackle of fire (sound design by Nate Edmondson).”
    - Jo Litson (Scene And Heard)

    “…intelligent use of whooshing sound cues (by Nate Edmondson) that punctuate the storytelling dramatically.”
    - Elissa Blake (Sun Herald)

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THE LIGHT BOX:
    “…supported by a very superior and beautifully atmospheric composition/soundtrack by Nate Edmondson. Its detail is wondrous.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Immersive design (Dylan Tonkin, with sound by Nate Edmondson and lights by Benjamin Brockman)… make for an involving 70 minutes.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “Add some simple but effective sound design (Nate Edmondson) and the space is transformed.”
    - Time Out Sydney

    “From a masked man covered in metal spoons to a ceiling of floating cardboard birds, blood-stained palms and recurring dark melodies, The Light Box successfully dismantles theatrical conventions and is both eerie and captivating from start to finish.”
    - Gavin Fernando (Alternative Media Group)

    “The sound design by Nate Edmondson and lighting by Benjamin Brockman add atmosphere and help the audience as it constantly has to reorientate.”
    - Maggy Franklin (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “It’s almost psychedelic in its effect; its rhythms relate to unfamiliar time signatures. Tonkin’s extraordinary design is strongly supported by Benjamin Brockman’s lighting and Nate Edmondson’s unobtrusive but noteworthy composition and sound. Here is a burgeoning Philip Glass or Michael Nyman.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Australian Stage)

    “…all of it wrapped up in the surreal sounds of Nate Edmondson.”
    - Lisa Thatcher (Lisa Thatcher)

    “James Dalton heads the production fantastically, making a seemingly disjointed story cohesive and engaging, assited by an effectively designed set (by Dylan Tonkin), lighting (Benjamin Brockman) and sound (Nate Edmondson).”
    - Fern George (The Actor’s Pulse)

    “The design elements are terrific. Sound, lighting, costumes and set are transportative, and entirely mesmerising. The production bears the aesthetic of an avant garde installation but is undoubtedly theatrical in its approach. The care taken to utilise all the potentialities of an empty space is impressive, and breathtaking.”
    - Suzy Wrong (Suzy Goes See)

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LORD OF THE FLIES:
    “By use of voice and pounding on the table, a soundscape and paper aeroplane we were transported through the air…”
    - L.B. Bermingham (Stage Whispers)

    “We walk in on an open stage where a group of nicely groomed boarding school girls are folding clothes and brushing hair, neatly dressed in pleated skirts and pretty blouses. The stage is set with heavy domestic furniture, a puzzling set-up as we know all the action is about to take place on a island. The girls begin a powerful thrumming against the wood, a paper plane is carried across the sky and we are there. It is an excellent introduction and we have high expectations as the first words are uttered.”
    - Deborah Stone (Arts Hub)

    “This production is intensely physical, gritty and fearsome…”
    - Kate Herbert (Kate Herbert Theatre Reviews)

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THIS HEAVEN:
    “Out of this rings a deafening gunshot. If sound designer, Nate Edmondson is trying to shock us, he succeeds. But I’m sure my palpitations will subside soon.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Crikey)

    “…abetted with Composition by Steve Francis and Sound Design by Nate Edmondson… all collaborators in this emotionally confronting night in the theatre.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “…the sound design and music of Nate Edmondson and Steve Francis, evoking Lui’s “idea of backstreets and darkness and fire and people, weaving in and out of the night.” An anger, a fire of anger, a conflagration in the night, desperation and sorrow and despair erupting, igniting, and being destroyed by morning.”
    - Sydney Theatre Seen

    “Luiz Pampolha’s lighting works in haunting conjunction with Alice Babidge and Sophie Fletcher’s set and the sound design and music of Nate Edmondson and Steve Francis, evoking Lui’s “idea of backstreets and darkness and fire and people, weaving in and out of the night.” An anger, a fire of anger, a conflagration in the night, desperation and sorrow and despair erupting, igniting, and being destroyed by morning.”
    - The Spell Of Waking Hours

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TORCH SONG TRILOGY:
    “In their spare moments members of the cast form a loose on-stage band with Wollaston on vocals and clarinet, Verevis on keyboard and Jordan on bass guitar. It works well in involving the actors with the progress of each piece and integrating the music in an unusually effective way (musical director Phil Scott, sound design Nate Edmondson).”
    - Diana Simmonds (Stage Noise)

    “Nate Edmondson’s sound keeps everything in perspective, too.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Crikey)

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RUST AND BONE:
    “McMahon’s uncluttered drum-tight production makes that immersion all the easier, with seamless cueing between Smith, Briggs and Musolino and crisp interplay with Teegan Lee’s lighting and Nate Edmondson’s sound design.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “Director Corey McMahon’s subtle direction simmers through the production from performance to production values, summoning sterling work from set and costume designer Michael Hankin, lighting designer Teegan Lee, and composer/sound designer Nate Edmondson.”
    - Richard Cotter (Sydney Arts Guide)

    “Violent interludes signal the building tension of battle, from the focused thrusts of Eddie (Sam Smith), a boxer haunted by tragedy, to the frustrated desperation of illegal dogfighter James (Renato Musolino), the overlapping dialogue is merged with sound designer Nate Edmondson’s astutely placed soundtrack, heightening the inevitable fallout of conflict.”
    - Alexandra Hayden (Time Out Sydney)

    “The lighting by Teegan Lee is unobtrusive, as is the sound by Nate Edmondson, mostly bare but hitting the gut when it needed.”
    - Tomas Boot (Theatre People)

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PSYCHO BEACH PARTY:
    “It’s a subversive look at gender and identity, and a celebration of popular culture. But mostly, with the dancing, snappy dialogue and rocking soundtrack, it’s a hilarious explosion of seaside fun.”
    - Ben Neutze (The Guardian)

    “…the Lighting (Katie Sfetkidis) and Sound Design (Nate Edmondson); plus, choreography that punches out all the style humour of the time, and, danced magnificently, is a great credit to Kurt Phelan, are all tops.
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “…any soundtrack that includes the B52’s ‘Rock Lobster’ gets my vote. This is just one highlight of a night full of great tracks, often accompanied by the kind of dance moves any play set in the swinging 60’s simply has to include.”
    - Mark Taylor (Arts Hub)

    “With rocking song and dance moments, coming out stories, a psychotic mother and beach bums galore, this tightly directed production is all killer, no filler.”
    - Jonathan Hindmarsh (The Brag)

    Psycho Beach Party is part high-camp homage to ’60s surfer flicks, part coming-of-age tale, complete with catchy tunes and some great dance numbers.”
    - Kate Rose (Herald Sun)

    “Songs featured (like the quirky, surreal and iconic Rock Lobster) help build the psycho beach party atmosphere…”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Australian Stage)

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FALLOUT:
    “One passage in particular shows how far people untrammelled by empathy and conscience can go, and thanks to some well-disguised sound effects, it is a test for the squeamish in this intimate space.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “This welter of incomprehensible noise and emotion, underlined, later in the play, with a gesture to the theatre of cruelty of yesteryear, with a gruesome moment of the visual and, particularly, aural, crunching of the fingers/bones of one character by another were truly moments of squirming in one’s seat. Here, the sound design by Nate Edmondson, including this finger crunch, was outstanding, in its moment to moment attention (2012, a busy, prolific, year for Mr Edmondson).”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Kip Williams directs with a steady hand ­– Nate Edmondson’s spooky score perfectly serves the production’s cinematic sensibilities – and does a fine job at pitting his tortured players against each other… The Old Fitz at its grittiest and grippingest.”
    - Darryn King (Time Out Sydney)

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THE HIDING PLACE:
    “Then, to wrap it all in a world of awe, is the aural contribution by another young artist Nate Edmondson who has created a sound composition and design of tremendous detail and beauty. (Mr Edmondson is prolific too, and this work, along with his contributions to ‘The Seafarer’ and ‘The Highway Crossing’, this year, must set a benchmark for excellence in creative voicing of textual developments and thematic motifs in his playwright’s writings, with Sound Designs involving scrupulous script analysis – rare indeed today, in my experience in recent theatre going.)”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “The set design is immediately striking. Using something as simple as sheets of paper fixed to a hanging net, Gez Xavier Mansfield creates a flaking, slanted ceiling that might also be a stairway to heaven, or the imagination, or both. This impression is further enhanced by Sara Swersky’s and Nate Edmondon’s atmospheric lighting and sound designs, respectively. Indeed, while simplicity as a design aesthetic is prone to seem cheap or sketchy, here it suggests clarity, an uncluttered and harmonious creative vision across the entire production team.”
    - Joan Beal (Arts Hub)

    “With well developed characters and potent lighting and sound, The Hiding Place is a well rounded and brilliantly executed play.”
    - Naomi Gall (The Near And The Elsewhere)

    “Nate Edmondson’s sound and Sara Swersky’s lighting design shows remarkable flair and potential for sensitivity…”
    - Rima Sabina Aouf (Concrete Playground)

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THE SEAFARER:
    “…the peaks and troughs of tension are precisely regulated by Tony Youlden’s lighting and sound designer Nate Edmondson’s spooky underscore and effects.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “The atmosphere…supported with another detailed sound design by Nate Edmondson, is truly disgusting in its realities. There is something rotting in this world.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “So a few technical thumbs up to finish: Nate Edmondson’s sound design of the blaring storm happening outside (and inside) the house…”
    - Jane Simmons (Shit On Your Play)

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THE HIGHWAY CROSSING:
    “Nate Edmondson’s quietly insistent sound plot – which operates at the auditory threshold much of the time – subtly amplifies our unease.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “However, the key design element, is a fully immersive Sound and Compositional soundtrack/score that is particular to every shift of development in the story telling, the subtle cueing and minutiae of construction, telling, and a major ‘character’ in the events of the production. Nate Edmondson is the artist responsible.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

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LYREBIRD:
    “Nate Edmondson’s sound design helps govern the mood without pushing too hard.”
    - Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald)

    “Nate Edmondson’s composition and sound design is pitch-perfect, too, lending a lonely, devastated, desperate air.”
    - Lloyd Bradford Syke (Crikey)

    “Experimental and powerfully atmospheric, sound designer Nate Edmondson’s ghost-like echoes, incongruous whizzing, birdcalls and siren trills from ‘Heart of Glass’ by Blondie leave you filled with a wistful, hollow abandonment felt only in the bush.”
    - Dianne Cohen (Concrete Playground)

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THE PARIS LETTER:
    “Director Stephen Colyer, in conjunction with his great cast and creative team, has conjured up a terrific production.”
    - Lynne Lancaster (Arts Hub)

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TWO BY TWO:
    “Working with a design that leaves us craving sun and fluffy towels (Emma Kingsbury, set and costume; Nate Edmondson, sound) and a cast who let us love their characters through their faults, director Stephen Nicolazzo creates a mood that spatters hope among the inevitable despair.”
    - Anne-Marie Peard (Aussie Theatre)

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THIS YEAR’S ASHES:
    “…with the tender and resonant score composition by Steve Francis rendered in the impressive sound design by Nate Edmondson, all is a whole. This is a very impressive, assured production. One feels safe and therefore, open to the journey of the play, from the start.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Embracing the simple theatricality: suggestive lights (Verity Hampson), carrying music (composition Steve Francis, sound design Nate Edmondson), single set (Carmody), Ellen’s bedroom becomes every room… Until through the words of Adam, we are off on an adventure across Sydney, a magical escape without a hand to touch the setting.”
    - No Plain Jane

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FEFU AND HER FRIENDS:
    “In a cool garden setting by Eliza McLean and wistful lighting by Sara Swersky the atmospheres are heightened by the Sound design of Nate Edmondson.”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

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PICTURES OF
BRIGHT LIGHTS:
    “The Sound Design by Nate Edmondson is alluring to the mood of the piece…”
    - Kevin Jackson (Kevin Jackson’s Theatre Diary)

    “Chemistry is a key word here, as it is between the lighting (Nicholas Rayment), stage (Anya Tasmin) and sound design (Nate Edmondson), with a special round of applause owing to director Stephen Nicolazzo as alchemist-in-chief. Pictures of Bright Lights may be about the transmutation of memory and meaning, but the end result is certainly golden.”
    - Gareth Beal (Arts Hub)

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